Why should we buy into Fing?

I've been using the fing app for quite some time (on & off) under iOS, but I'm new to the forum, so at some point I may break one or another forum bi-laws.  So... when stepping on toes, I'll try to do quickly & lightly.   ;-)  

The purchase of a new router prompted looking into an easy-to-use firewall more seriously.  FIrst priority is firewall, network protection, and monitoring.  Easy to interpret user interface (dummy proof)  and possible tools to work with our router and help keep our internet speeds fast.

Admittedly, knowing little about the software and hardware side of Fing I wanted to get true, honest user views, opinions, and advice.  In just the very quick glance I took into some topic comments... I'm a little leery now though.  I could also tell some of my pre-notions are probably incorrect.

I thought the Fingbox was simply a optional hardware side to the software, offering more function and ability?  I also thought purchasing the box would also gain a more cohesive (sync'd) experience between desktop and mobile app, which after reading in the forum - sadly doesn't appear that's at all possible?  It behoves me that after I first found Fing years ago, that the problem still has not been addressed.  That's not encouraging.  I was also under the impression that with a Fingbox there were no subscriptions, or yearly fees?  I guess I may be wrong about that, too?

I think I read that Fing handles network traffic differently than other firewalls - in a way that it's monitoring for potential attack/problems as opposed to reading/sorting through ALL the network traffic.  Is that true? 

Albeit... I need to contact Fing's sales to gain a better understanding of their product(s), but right now - I'm looking for valuable reasons, answers and experiences, and I value ANY input.   So... Fing users -- why should I join into the Fing family as opposed to one of several other consumer level quick and easy firewall options?  What are the advantages, and disadvantages?  Your likes & dislikes?  Successes?    

Thanks to everyone /anyone's time .... and patience. ;-)
cheers.

Answers

  • Marc
    Marc Moderator, Beta Tester Posts: 2,569
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    Hi @Placebo..  Let me see if I can help clarify...  Fing is NOT a firewall.  Neither the appliance, Fingbox, nor the desktop or mobile apps can do what a firewall can do.  The applications by themselves are mostly troubleshooting and discovery products.  They can tell you what is on your network and can do a bit of troubleshooting and reporting on those things that are active. 

    The Fingbox appliance adds to what the mobile application can do and adds a bit more security related functions. It can block some select attack vectors for instance.  It can also block unknown devices from attaching to your wifi and can control when and who can access the network and for how long.  Also can tell you who is home and who is out.  Think of that as form of parental control.  It can also let you know unassociated devices that are nearby your network in the form of what they call a digital fence.  All of these good for visibility...

    A Fingbox can ONLY be used with the mobile app and does not interact with the desktop app.  Fing treats the desktop as a separate stand alone product from the Fingbox.

    As for the desktop and mobile version of the software they produce.  The Mobile and desktop software are complimentary.  You can manage the desktop discovered devices on the mobile app and for the most part, without a Fingbox, they do similar things.  There are also free and premium versions of the software and some features vary depending on the tier you choose.

    Fing has a products page in case you have not seen it...  https://www.fing.com/products


    Thats Daphnee, she's a good dog...
    RobinPlacebo
  • Placebo
    Placebo Member Posts: 6
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    edited May 25
    Hey Marc -
    As I've mentioned... I've been using the iOS app (free) for quite some time, but not frequent, so I know some of the networking features, but I thought there would be more capabilities with the paid version along with the FingBox.  I had also been led to believe, as you see, that Fing incorporated firewall capability.  Tells you what kind of rabbit holes google searches will lead you down.  ;-)  

    If I read correctly... some things "kind of" play together between mobile, desktop, and box?  When logging into the forums I hadn't realized the find apparently works online through a browser as well.  As I noticed... I was looking at all m devices, and network information.

    I had already presumed desktop and mobile Fing didn't play together from what I had read.  I came across a specific string regarding the point and how long it seems to have been requested.  It's unfortunate Fing hasn't listened.  In a time that it seems like almost every kind of app syncs across platforms.  You can include me with the disappointment.

    I've already been to the product page for EACH of the three areas they show.  I hate coming into a forum or ask someone anything unless before I've already at least tried to look and figure some of "it" out.  Honestly, to me... the product pages are vague, without detail, just scratching the surface.  And... I was hoping to get personal feedback like yours.

    My conclusion without further input....
    Correct me if I'm off, but I've concluded Fing and it's products are really more for IT analyzing, help with network info and trouble shooting?  I don't see much sense for an average consumer to have any Fing products since many of today's routers actually have some of the same kind of tools, and more tools we had even just ten years ago.  

    Well... I was hoping to have the tools Fing advertises, but had hoped firewall was included with that.  I don't think I'll bother any further than the free versions of Fing unless anyone else shares an experience that changes my mind. 

    BTW - I didn't see an answer.  Does Fing operate under a subscription model in any way?

    Thanks for your feedback Marc
    -Barry  
    (aka - Placebo)
  • Placebo
    Placebo Member Posts: 6
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       *** FOLLOW UP ***
    After hearing the depressing news (thanks Marc)   ;)  :'(  :#   ... I have a quick follow up question.  Anyone... have a favorite firewall?
    Since I was (incorrectly) looking to Fing as a firewall solution... does anyone have a favorite, consumer level firewall solution option?  One that's not going to compromise speed.  

    When I've been looking I found some can't handle gigabit speed.  The firewall would need to excel in that area.  Some of the several I've looked at,  Ubiquity's, Bitfender, Cujo (which is no longer)  and Firewalla, which apparently all of their current devices can't handle gigabit speeds.  I don't know if some, or if any operate /function without a subscription?

    Anyone... have a favorite firewall, or could suggest a few different firewalls?


  • Placebo
    Placebo Member Posts: 6
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    I'm adding more responses myself.  LOL I'm providing one explanation myeslf indirectly from Fing.  
    I came across this article while search for firewall solutions.  Recalling memory - I believe sometime way back a Fing employee tried to explain how Fing sorts through data and threats better (and faster) because their process is different than that of a firewall.  

    The news/article is from Fing's own site, title:  Firewall vs Device Blocking - what's the difference....
    https://www.fing.com/news/firewalls-vs-device-blocking/
             "Unlike firewalls, Fingbox also does not re-route all your network traffic through it for packet scanning, and so it will not lead to the data queues that slow down your connection."

    I don't know... but this level of security with our router's already built in security might be enough?

    Marc said:
    Hi @Placebo..  Let me see if I can help clarify...  Fing is NOT a firewall.  Neither the appliance, Fingbox, nor the desktop or mobile apps can do what a firewall can do.  The applications by themselves are mostly troubleshooting and discovery products.  They can tell you what is on your network and can do a bit of troubleshooting and reporting on those things that are active. 
  • Marc
    Marc Moderator, Beta Tester Posts: 2,569
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    As for firewalls, a number of folks on the forum seem to like firewalla...  See this thread (its pretty long)..  https://community.fing.com/discussion/6680/firewalla-gold-info

    Thats Daphnee, she's a good dog...
  • Placebo
    Placebo Member Posts: 6
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    Marc said:
    As for firewalls, a number of folks on the forum seem to like firewalla...  See this thread (its pretty long)..  https://community.fing.com/discussion/6680/firewalla-gold-info

    Yea... as I mentioned in my first post - Firewalla was one of my first viable considerations.  Unfortunately, none of their models, except maybe Gold, the one you mentioned, and the most expensive - can't handle gigabit speed, which is what we have.  Gold is $428.  A little steep for home use.
  • Marc
    Marc Moderator, Beta Tester Posts: 2,569
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    edited May 25
    In most cases, a combination of your router and operating systems firewalls could be sufficient.  Not perfect but they are there and free.  I am assuming you have a recent name brand router as the firmware of older ones tend to fall behind patch wise, depending on how the manufacturer supports it.
    Thats Daphnee, she's a good dog...
  • wayner
    wayner Member, Beta Tester Posts: 32
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    Are you sure about Ubiquiti not being able to handle Gigabit speeds for the WAN.  I have 500mbps and it handles that fine.  I haven't heard of that issue before, but it may be because not everyone has Gigabit speeds.   FYI I have a Ubiquiti USG gateway.
  • TimeStamp
    TimeStamp Falling Water, CanadaMember Posts: 9
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    I can add my two cents...I being a subscriber and thinking that " Fing " was an added " security app that would affront me the knowledge that a device other than my own had latched on to my network as I had in the past a security breach where someone got past my firewalls and infiltrated my router and system despite very complex passwords. What I have discovered about " Fing " is that there seems to be a lot of excuses for reporting/identifying incorrectly, example in point... currently while on VPN, the desktop app reports that my internet provider while on a Toronto server ( seems only certain servers are affected in this reporting error or non-error ) is actually in the Ukrain? I have extensively devoted a considerable amount of hours troubleshooting this with my VPN provider and have concluded that the issue does NOT lie with the server or VPN service but with the Fing reporting end. This is only one of several incorrect reporting issues I have had paying for Fing the past 6 months with the ONLY legit issue being that the "Private address " feature on my IOS devices will report them as " new " or at times " altered " devices. In conclusion, that fact the Fing reports incorrectly makes it a marginal value as a security aid to my network monitoring. It may have other value to some in IT but as for a home user wanting to monitor devices on your network, it seems like a bit of a crap shoot. I'll be cancelling auto billing on App Store...
    Milo and younger brother Escher
  • Placebo
    Placebo Member Posts: 6
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    wayner said:
    Are you sure about Ubiquiti not being able to handle Gigabit speeds for the WAN.  I have 500mbps and it handles that fine.  I haven't heard of that issue before, but it may be because not everyone has Gigabit speeds.   FYI I have a Ubiquiti USG gateway.
    I've neglected responding.  Sorry.

    Going back to my original post - you'll see that while I refer to several devices - I only refer to one not being able to do gigabit speed:
       "Some of the several I've looked at,  Ubiquity's, Bitfender, Cujo (which is no longer)  and Firewalla, which apparently all of their current devices can't handle gigabit speeds"  
    In this case - "their"...  is only referring to Firewalla.  They do have one device capable of gigabit speed but I didn't include it because it's well over $200.

    To be fair... it's now been so long since I first reviewed those product's information & limitations.  I don't recall if Ubiquiti was capable of gigabit or greater speeds.  Depends which model, but they run more expensive.  

    But also... certainly... there's a big difference between 500mbps and 1.5 - 3gbps service, or even just a gigabit service.  Regardless - I still haven't chosen a firewall option.  Heck... I'm still dealing with trying to find a new router.  

    ----------

    We were using a temporary router (D-Link EA7500) that couldn't handle the number of wireless we have.  So, we tried one of TP-Link's top models (AX6000 I think)  and it kept dropping clients left and right.  We're now using Netgear RAX70.  Their pre-sales told me it could handle 65 clients per band. *WRONG*  I find out later it's only 32 per.  Now I'm finding out I have to pay for what's normally a common function /feature to most routers -- parental control.  I could still do that manually, but I'm not sure if Netgear nixed that ability when accessing the router via browser interface.  Don't bet me on their supposed "security" services they want me to pay.  It seems now the only thing that will help is an additional access point.

    So... subsequently - I'm taking router (or option)  suggestions   LOL!   But seriously - it needs to be able to handle 55 - 70 wireless clients.

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