Fing Desktop for Linux

Why there isn't a version of Fing Desktp for Linux? Especially considering the fact macOS is unix based.
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  • RobinRobin Administrator Posts: 3,121
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    admin
    Hi @maxmonz
    Thanks for the suggestion. I have made this post as an Idea and please make sure to upvote the initial post if other users want to get this implemented as well.
    Robin (Admin at Fing)
    Getting Started? Please refer to Community guidelines & Community User Guides("Helping Hand"). HAPPY POSTING!!!
    D_Dave_00PappyMessyNikkkenyaQuinn
  • WestdamWestdam Member, Beta Tester Posts: 2
    5 Likes First Comment Photogenic

    Agree. Id love a Linux app too.

    RMERWildPappyNikkkenyaLinux_RobQuinn
  • vhradicevhradice Member Posts: 5
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    Will the windows version of Fing run under Wine?
    Pappy
  • vhradicevhradice Member Posts: 5
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    Just for grins, I downloaded the windows version and tried it under Wine.  It installs and will load but it does not recognize my network. 
    Why don't intelligent developers acknowledge the presence of Linux in the internet community and make their apps work on Linux?
    How many people know that there are more devices running Linux than any version of windows?
    RMEjorgeg73លាបDa_veNikkkenya
  • hotrodmilthotrodmilt Member Posts: 1
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    How about a Raspberry pi .img based on Rasbian?
    Milt....
    RWildGlyn2004
  • SotirisSotiris Member Posts: 1
    First Comment
    It is ironic that fingbox is based on Ubuntu core, but does not have a desktop app for Ubuntu or any other Linux distro...
    QuinnDa_veNikkkenyaLinux_Robkapn
  • mozarellamozarella Member, Beta Tester Posts: 111
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    Actually i would also be happy if there'll be a linux version of fing.app desktop. But without fingbox-connectivity (like the mobile app), fing.app desktop is not usable for me
    RME
  • Nogueira13Nogueira13 Member Posts: 1
    Photogenic First Comment
    It is a pity that we don't have a linux version for Fing. What are the plans of Fing Developers to adapt Fing to be used with Linux?
  • CiaranCiaran Administrator Posts: 985
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    admin
    hi Nogueira, thanks for the feddback. Currently it is not on the Product plan to include a Linux version. Of course this could change in the future, however I do not want to set any false expectations, hence I can just base on the current product plan. thanks
    Ciaran (Admin at Fing)
    Getting Started? Please refer to Community guidelines & Community User Guides("Helping Hand"). HAPPY POSTING!!!
  • sagg629sagg629 Member Posts: 2
    First Comment
    Hi all. Like you I'd love a Linux version of this awesome app. I use Ubuntu 18.04 as my daily SO and Windows 10 as a spare one.
    I was able to run Fing in Linux by installing manually the application in .deb format. Running in terminal "sudo fing" brings very very basic info about the network devices. I've downloaded from here https://www.fing.com/images/uploads/general/CLI_Linux_Debian_5.5.2.zip
    At least, is something.
  • WestdamWestdam Member, Beta Tester Posts: 2
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    Where you find this tool and this link????

  • vhradicevhradice Member Posts: 5
    Photogenic First Comment
    Check out this page for Linux alternatives  https://alternativeto.net/software/fing/?platform=linux

  • sagg629sagg629 Member Posts: 2
    First Comment
    Westdam said:

    Where you find this tool and this link????

    Hi Westdam. I've found this link in the "Fing Development Toolkit" section inside the Fing website, exactly from here: https://www.fing.com/products/development-toolkit

  • D_Dave_00D_Dave_00 Member Posts: 2
    Photogenic First Comment
    Would be a great applicative. also for Linux. I upvote the first post to encourage the developers.
  • maxmonzmaxmonz Member Posts: 2
    First Comment Photogenic

    Honestly I don't understand why in 2020, with a big Linux community, many companies are still ignoring this operating system which is better than Windows and comparable with MacOS.

  • FerlautoFerlauto White Plains, NYMember Posts: 53
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    While Linux is not a consumer platform, it is very much a developer platform. As such, if there are plans to have an open architecture (e.g. support plug-ins, have an API, etc.) then having Linux desktop client is a must-have to bring in the developer community.
  • RWildRWild Member Posts: 48
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    sagg629 said:
    Westdam said:

    Where you find this tool and this link????

    Hi Westdam. I've found this link in the "Fing Development Toolkit" section inside the Fing website, exactly from here: https://www.fing.com/products/development-toolkit

    Wow! The documentation of the CLI/SDK version is very much improved since the last time I looked. Will have to put playing with the tool back on my list of to-do's
    Ciaran
  • PappyPappy Member Posts: 1
    First Comment Photogenic

    Before I discovered fing for desktop I was using "Angry IP". A version of fing for linux would be nice.

  • D_Dave_00D_Dave_00 Member Posts: 2
    Photogenic First Comment
    Pappy said:

    "Angry IP"

    A totally different appliance, despite the fact that could be "similar".
    Furthermore, on Linux, I can achieve the same (and quicker) by using the command line
    sudo arp-scan --interface=wlan0 -l -r 6 -g

    Fing (used with FingBox) can do more, and Angry IP Scanner is very very basilar, IMHO.

  • amiroff157amiroff157 Member Posts: 2
    Photogenic First Comment
    Totally support the idea! we need a CLI or even a GUI tool for Linux!
  • laffer1laffer1 Member Posts: 4
    Name Dropper Photogenic First Comment
    Ferlauto said:
    While Linux is not a consumer platform, it is very much a developer platform. As such, if there are plans to have an open architecture (e.g. support plug-ins, have an API, etc.) then having Linux desktop client is a must-have to bring in the developer community.
    Linux is a consumer platform though. ChromeOS, Android, etc.  Linux users aren't always power users anymore.  It does make sense to me why they didn't target Linux for the app right now, but there are valid reasons to support it.  If by some miracle Atari VCS takes off, it could run there too.  (it has to ship first)  
  • FerlautoFerlauto White Plains, NYMember Posts: 53
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    @laffer1 I think you are splitting a hair here with your definition of , "consumer operating system."

    99.99% of the people who buy Chromebooks never touch the OS in any meaningful capacity.  To the average Chromebook user, everything is just a web browser.  The OS is functioning in the capacity of an "appliance."  No different than a microwave oven.  Most people buy Chromebooks (and I have one), because they can just turn it on and start using it. Pretty much anything that runs in a browser runs on a Chromebook, Fing included.

    As for Android, there is an Android Fing app.  Why?  Because it has widespread consumer adoption.  But it is not Linux in the traditional sense.  Linux desktop apps that run on Red Hat, Ubuntu, etc. do not just run on Android.  Android is a consumer operating system, and it does happen to have a portion of its demographic that are tinkerers. But most Android users, just use their device just like any iOS device, they turn it on and run the native (Android -- not Linux) apps.

    Even if the Atari VCS takes off, it may have a "hacker bent" to its demographics (similar to Android), what will make the platform thrive is its portfolio of games.  

    By no objective measure would any reasonable person in a marketing, product management  or other business decision-making capacity consider Linux a "consumer" platform. Having lived through two tech "culture wars" over the years (OS/2 and Lotus Notes, respectively), there is plenty of history on this front.  What makes Linux different from those two is that it has its own unique, very broad base of users, the demographics are overwhelminly developers, and system administrators.  

    To say that Linux is a consumer operating system implies that one can go to consumer marketing place (e.g. Best Buy, Costco, Staples, etc.) and readily and easily buy their choice of desktop computer running Linux of some flavor.  At best, they might have something special order.  

    I will close by saying I believe there is a need for a native Linux desktop Fing app because there are a fair number of tinkerers / hackers in the Fing community (the high number of upvotes demonstrates this)  and this would attract more of them to Fing (and its parent, Domotz).
    bstaples
  • laffer1laffer1 Member Posts: 4
    Name Dropper Photogenic First Comment
    Ferlauto said:
    @laffer1 I think you are splitting a hair here with your definition of , "consumer operating system."

    99.99% of the people who buy Chromebooks never touch the OS in any meaningful capacity.  To the average Chromebook user, everything is just a web browser.  The OS is functioning in the capacity of an "appliance."  No different than a microwave oven.  Most people buy Chromebooks (and I have one), because they can just turn it on and start using it. Pretty much anything that runs in a browser runs on a Chromebook, Fing included.
    I don't think you can say 99% never use the OS. There are too many posts and guides on installing apps on chromebooks out there.  I've even had non technical relatives ask me how to get a word processor on the devices that can work offline. They don't want to use google docs. 
    At this point, Linux is widely popular for embedded, servers, IoT and it's moving fast into the desktop.  Consider that Microsoft has linux emulation in windows now.  Apple's new WWDC demo included running Linux in a VM as part of their presentation.  Most game consoles are running Linux or FreeBSD (PS4), really you can single out the xbox as the freak.  Consumers are surrounded by Linux. 
    As for your retail argument,  you can certainly buy Linux laptops from Dell, Lenovo, System 76 and others. You can walk into best buy and buy a chromebook. 
    I'm not saying Linux has huge market share for consumers. We all know that. It's pretty easy to see it grow, especially within the target audience here. Apple's macOS and ARM moves will force some onto Linux.  That's another discussion though. 
    I think it's reasonable to want a Linux client. I'm not pushing for a client for my BSD project which has very little market share. 
  • FerlautoFerlauto White Plains, NYMember Posts: 53
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    @laffer1 Firstly, we agree that there should be a Linux client, but for different reasons.

    Beyond that, you basically proved my point. Everything you mentioned was for developers, who create products for consumers.  Likewise, tte reason Microsoft supports Linux is for the back-end, not the front.

    With all the examples you mentioned, the consumer is "using Linux" with at least one, if not more abstraction layers between them and Linux, wihch is way, way down below in the stack.  i.e. They're not "using Linux."  laying a game on a Sony PS4 is, at least in my book, not, "using Linux." It's an appliance that plays video games.  

    Likewise, Chome OS Linux; Google used Linux to create Chrome OS. Just like G.E. used to use filaments to create incandescent light bulbs.  They are components that the consumer is removed from directly interacting with.

    And sorry to tell you this, but you cannot go to Best Buy and purchase any computer with a "real" version of Linux (e.g. Red Hat, Ubuntu, etc.) as the pre-installed operating system.



    No one says, that they're driving a particular engine and transmission to the store.  They say they are driving a particular model of car.

    The raw number of posts on any subject without context otherwise is an absolutely meaningless statistic.  This is like saying the number of tweets on a subject is completely indicative of public sentiment.

    I will close by saying again that we agree there should be a native Fing desktop client for Linux.

    bstaples
  • laffer1laffer1 Member Posts: 4
    Name Dropper Photogenic First Comment
    Ferlauto said:
    @laffer1 Firstly, we agree that there should be a Linux client, but for different reasons.

    Beyond that, you basically proved my point. Everything you mentioned was for developers, who create products for consumers.  Likewise, tte reason Microsoft supports Linux is for the back-end, not the front.

    With all the examples you mentioned, the consumer is "using Linux" with at least one, if not more abstraction layers between them and Linux, wihch is way, way down below in the stack.  i.e. They're not "using Linux."  laying a game on a Sony PS4 is, at least in my book, not, "using Linux." It's an appliance that plays video games.  

    Likewise, Chome OS Linux; Google used Linux to create Chrome OS. Just like G.E. used to use filaments to create incandescent light bulbs.  They are components that the consumer is removed from directly interacting with.

    And sorry to tell you this, but you cannot go to Best Buy and purchase any computer with a "real" version of Linux (e.g. Red Hat, Ubuntu, etc.) as the pre-installed operating system.



    No one says, that they're driving a particular engine and transmission to the store.  They say they are driving a particular model of car.

    The raw number of posts on any subject without context otherwise is an absolutely meaningless statistic.  This is like saying the number of tweets on a subject is completely indicative of public sentiment.

    I will close by saying again that we agree there should be a native Fing desktop client for Linux.

    Linux is a kernel. ChromeOS uses it. It is linux.  Now if you want to get into distros, you are right about that but you're adding additional constraints to the conversation too.  Best Buy didn't include mac computers for a long time either. Did apple not exist until best buy started selling them? Note that best buy considers this linux compatible :)  


  • benabena Member, Beta Tester Posts: 18
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    yes fing for linux yes
    Ferlauto
  • Pablo613Pablo613 Member Posts: 1
    First Comment Photogenic
    Ferlauto said:
    And sorry to tell you this, but you cannot go to Best Buy and purchase any computer with a "real" version of Linux (e.g. Red Hat, Ubuntu, etc.) as the pre-installed operating system.
    I consider Fing to be a relatively advanced networking tool.  Fing Desktop definitely flattens the learning curve and adds some useful tool / information that would be of interest to non-technical users but for the most part, I'm guessing the majority of Fing users aren't newbies.  Which is the target audience of Best Buy computer sales.

    I mean the exact same model available at BB is almost always available for cheaper online.  And you get to skip being pressured into buying extended warranties and severely over-priced accessories.  If you're weary about some of the ecommerce vendors, the manufacturer's themselves almost always have an internet storefront (Lenovo, Dell, HP).  And on those store fronts, you can in fact order a new laptop with Ubuntu, RH or Fedora (aka Real Linux as you put it) pre-installed.
  • denobulan77denobulan77 Member Posts: 1
    First Comment
    +1 for Linux compatibility. 
    Pablo613
  • Linux_RobLinux_Rob Member Posts: 1
    First Comment
    maxmonz said:
    Why there isn't a version of Fing Desktp for Linux? Especially considering the fact macOS is unix based.
    yet another app that gets the Linux cold shoulder.... yes, we do exist out here.... 
    MacOS = BSD Unix based
    Android = Linux based
    so many Netadmins use Linux, and Fing is a Netadmin tool, so why the exclusion???
  • KellosKellos Member Posts: 1
    First Comment

    +1

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