can someone explain how I can catch my ex probing in my phone with this app

Mandy_Yow13
Mandy_Yow13 Member Posts: 1
edited June 25, 2021 in Devices & Security #1

Hello. So for starters, I am not tech savvy. But have had an ex potentially im my phone for quite some time. I need to get the proof, he knows Im not tech savvy. I know this is happening as he knows info that he claims to guess. help please

bruncky

Answers

  • Marc
    Marc Moderator, Beta Tester Posts: 2,665
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    Hey @Mandy_Yow13, I moved this to the security section for better visibility.  Let's see if someone jumps in with advice.
    Thats Daphnee, she's a good dog...
  • BrayPagan
    BrayPagan Member Posts: 2
    Photogenic First Comment
    get a new phone, you may have an app in yours that he could have put there.  Its doubtable that he is just hacking into your phone.  You also should remember all social media that you post or your friends post while with you is going to be seen by him wants.

    Marc
  • Rmark1083
    Rmark1083 Member Posts: 1
    First Comment

    Mandy if you want to see if he installed an app there's several ways you can go about looking. If you have Android, go to settings, biometrics and security, other security settings. What your looking for are the settings for device admin apps. At the very least you'll probably see Google pay, and Find my device. If there's an app you don't remember installing, try and look it up first to see what it is before removing the admin rights.

    You can also look to see which apps allow "install from unknown sources" and in the app permissions to look for any apps you didn't install.

    You do not need a new device A factory data reset will remove any installed apps and put the phone back to it's original state just like the day you purchased it. Removing your Google accounts before resetting it makes things easier. Do not restore any backups during setup.

    ColdJadedEyes08
  • Sweetlee
    Sweetlee AdelaideMember Posts: 5
    Photogenic First Comment

    Hello, what if you have an iPhone?

  • Popula
    Popula Member Posts: 30
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    The only failsafe action is to reset your phone, because you have no clue what your ex has done with it.

    Go to Settings -> General -> Reset and choose “Erase all content and settings”.

    Make sure you have your iCloud email and password ready.

    You will have to re-install your apps from the AppStore. But that’s exactly what you want.

    Next time, keep that device on your person. Never let anyone tinker with it.

    Good luck.

  • Mr_Smith
    Mr_Smith Member Posts: 1
    First Comment
    edited July 3, 2021 #7

    I don't know if it's the same for apple as it is for Android but most of the time your apps are all automatically installed from your previous phone if you synced with a cloud or Google play. Now with that being said all the apps are that you have automatically synced with your cloud or Google will be reinstalled as well as settings which includes any apps that you do not want. So be careful when you set up your new phone if you do get a new phone which I would recommend as well as setting up a newApple or Google account with new passwords for any and all apps that you have previously set up and I would set them up individually one by one rather than having them all synced up and installed automatically. It's better safe than sorry you know what I'm saying? Hopefully you do, good luck with everything I know how exs can be straight up psycho sometimes.



    ****Also be careful when factory resetting your phone sometimes that is all it takes for a Trojan, keylogger or some type of virus to fully latch into your phone to make it fully untraceable and undetectable.****

  • DirtyOldBiker
    DirtyOldBiker Member Posts: 2
    First Comment
    Okay, you can ignore a lot of the doomsday bs posts. First, even if he installed Fing, even if he built & injected a module to run as root daemon at startup, it really isn't anything to worry about. There are so many other things he'd have to do to make useful as a stocking tool, that it wouldn't be worth the hassle, particularly when there are much more appropriate tools for tracking location, data packets, even recording phone calls & text messages. In fact, that can be accomplished easily enough without much work, using Apples parental tools. Not to mention that while exploits do exist for iOS, they are not generally root exploits that allow carte blanche access. Unless he is a genius with experience, not a whole lot he can do quickly, not without jail breaking and spending a significant amount of time with your device. 

    If you want to be safe, hopefully you have backups from before you issues began, with that you could reset your device via iTunes or whatever you use, with the device offline, then once restored make sure your dns is using a secure and private DNS service, that notifications are on for services like location & mic/speaker access, etc.
    OItherwise, download your apps & backup your docs, contacts, etc . via iTunes, transfer to or set a thumb drive as the backup location if possible. Once you are certain you have everything you need backed up, then you can reset/fully restore (even use the selling/gifting device option, though with solid state storage devices like nand, you can almost NEVER wipe everything to the point of no longer being recoverable). At any rate, once you have wiped the device, you can set it back up, or restore using iTunes, then once everything is set & you have a secure DNS & have enabled 2FA for login, you can then enable the device network connection. 

    While you can find ways to accomplish just about anything with tech, it is rarely a simple task, even for someone experienced. It takes time & effort. Unless he made his living phishing, spoofing or otherwise electronically defrauding people, it is unlikely he would have been able to do much without your notice & again, unless he is a pro, he is using a social hack or an older exploit, which can be detected and usually remedied easily enough, unlike a 0-day. 

    In the meantime, there are apps to detect more sophisticated spyware, personally, I'd want to catch the person, so I would set up a closed  off & firewalled virtual network, then use Wireshark to sniff & log packets, see what data is going out & where it is going.  If you are just after some assurance that your device is clean, you can start with Norton ($) or with BitDefender (free), both of which are for antivirus & spyware detection. Then power cycle your device (a lot of phishing type exploits do not survive a power cycle), restore & then make sure you enable notifications for services like camera, phone, data & GPS/location. I would also change your password regularly, like monthly, plus use something like Athn, or something simple like Authenticator (Google or M$ + others), Google Smart Lock, along with the iPhones built-in security key (if newer) & start using 2-factor authorization. I prefer separation, so I use a third party FIDO U2F key for authentication, but anything is better than nothing, so 2FA or U2F is a must, along with a good strong password (remember, websites have leaks, so never reuse the same password with multiple sites & they need to be changed every 3 to 9 months MINIMUM, more frequently if U2F or 2FA is not available. 
  • DirtyOldBiker
    DirtyOldBiker Member Posts: 2
    First Comment
    Popula said:

    The only failsafe action is to reset your phone, because you have no clue what your ex has done with it.

    Go to Settings -> General -> Reset and choose “Erase all content and settings”.

    Make sure you have your iCloud email and password ready.

    You will have to re-install your apps from the AppStore. But that’s exactly what you want.

    Next time, keep that device on your person. Never let anyone tinker with it.

    Good luck.

    This is probably best for you, as mentioned physical access, it's what's termed a "social hack" & along with human error & deception, it is the source for a many a security penetration.

    I would add that If it is unrealistic for you to refrain from sharing your device, that most modern devices have the ability to screen pin, or better yet, allow you to setup a very limited guest profile for others to use, similar to adding a profile for a child. 

    Everything takes time, so as long as you keep an eye out & don't notice anything unusual (messing with BT, WiFi, in settings, attaching a USB device, etc.), then it's less likely to be an issue. Do be sure to occasionally check your privacy & notification settings to ensure nothing is being hidden, silenced or allowed to function without your consent, such as location sharing or mail forwarding and so on...