Multiple wifi routers on channel

Brian_2020Brian_2020 Member Posts: 2
First Comment

Hello - I just did a scan of the channels on my wifi router and found multiple other wifi routers listed on some of the channels being used - is this normal? I took some screenshots and within about 2-3 minutes the other routers had disappeared and only my router was listed on the channels.

Best Answer

  • jwoods7947jwoods7947 Member Posts: 8
    First Answer First Anniversary First Comment Photogenic
    edited January 5 Accepted Answer

    Yes very normal. Signal from neighbors can come and go and usually don't have stable strength. You can see this info so your able to avoid the channels that other routers are using. You don't want to use a congested channel (other wifi networks are on) if all possible for the best wifi at your home. If you see multiple networks though that have your wifi name (SSID) and your not on a mesh system that would be concerning.

Answers

  • Brian_2020Brian_2020 Member Posts: 2
    First Comment

    Thanks for your reply - I'll keep my eye on it more frequently - I just checked again and I'm the only router on the channels for now. Being stuck at home I have some time to do some learning about this kinda thing Have a great day.

  • The_VorlonThe_Vorlon Member, Beta Tester Posts: 31
    10 Comments 5 Likes First Answer Name Dropper
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    Fing is basically reporting everything your WIFI router / access point is seeing. WIFI signal can be 'seen' at distances much further than useful for connectivity  (typically once signal strength falls below -80dB stable connectivity is problematic).  Your wireless device will detect neighboring devices - homes or apartments, the Starbucks on the corner, etc.  Channel interference is going to depend on signal strength and location.  If your wireless network is using channel 11 for example, and there is another wireless network on channel 11 but it's signal strength is  -70 dB,  and your clients see your wireless at a signal strength of -50dB, don't worry too much.

    Now if your wireless is channel 11, and the other network is channel 11,  and their signal strength is lower or close to yours, it's time to consider changing channels.  Note that for 2.4ghz channels 1, 6 and 11 are best practice (in US) - moving to channel 9 or 10 for example will not solve the problem, actually makes it worse in some cases - channel 9 can see interference from channel 6 and 11.  
    Sometimes talking to your neighbors and coming to a common understanding of who uses what channel can be useful - though you get the 'no one tells me what to do' answer sometimes (there is a 'fix' for that <grin>)

    Right now, looking at my network data - I can 'see' 136 neighboring access points. The vast majority are -80dB or higher, and of no consequence.  There are some that are in the -65dB to -75dB range but not really an inference issue for me - all my access point have power configurations such that anywhere with my coverage range the signal strength for clients is around -40dB to -48dB.
  • The_VorlonThe_Vorlon Member, Beta Tester Posts: 31
    10 Comments 5 Likes First Answer Name Dropper
    ✭✭

    Yes very normal. Signal from neighbors can come and go and usually don't have stable strength. You can see this info so your able to avoid the channels that other routers are using. You don't want to use a congested channel (other wifi networks are on) if all possible for the best wifi at your home. If you see multiple networks though that have your wifi name (SSID) and your not on a mesh system that would be concerning.

    Note - depending on signal strength the fact another wifi network is using the same channels may or may not be relevant.  A wifi network using channel 11 and a weak signal isn't something to get concerned over.  
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