Best Mesh Router/Wi-Fi System To Date

Manny_CavalierManny_Cavalier Member Posts: 13
edited September 10 in Devices & Security
What do you think is the best mesh router/wi-fi system in the market right now? And what make it standout than the rest?
VioletChepilRobinjunioSteveP

Comments

  • joshjjoshj Member Posts: 3
    I haven't used any other mesh networks, so my opinion comes from a vacuum, but: I have been incredibly happy with my AmpliFi. The mesh network is reliable, and it is incredibly easy to set up static IPs, and Port Forwarding. Installing updates is also easy, and it's very nice to be able to manage my router from the WAN.
    VioletChepilManny_Cavalier
  • waynerwayner Member Posts: 16
    I like Ubiquiti Unifi as it provides a really good UI and allows you to see a comprehensive view of your LAN, including WAPs, switches, router, etc - assuming that you buy all Unifi stuff.  Their WAPs are very good and use PoE so it reduces the amount of cabling required.
    VioletChepilJon_Irish
  • kltaylorkltaylor Member Posts: 464 ✭✭✭✭
    I think that we've talked about this already.
    Regardless, I use ASUS AI Mesh
    "There's a fine line between audacity and idiocy."
    -Warden Anastasia Luccio, Captain
    Manny_CavalierSparks
  • MarcMarc Member Posts: 313 ✭✭✭✭
    I use a Linksys EA9300 router that when combined with a Linksys RE9000, becomes a mesh network.  Kind of gives a bit of flexibility where I can keep the RE9000 as a mesh node (or nodes as I add more) with the EA9300 or directly wire the RE9000 and make it an access point.
    Thats Daphnee, she's a good dog...
    VioletChepilManny_Cavalier
  • Manny_CavalierManny_Cavalier Member Posts: 13
    edited September 13
    wayner said:
    I like Ubiquiti Unifi as it provides a really good UI and allows you to see a comprehensive view of your LAN, including WAPs, switches, router, etc - assuming that you buy all Unifi stuff.  Their WAPs are very good and use PoE so it reduces the amount of cabling required.
    Thanks!  But I don't think Unifi is considered as a mesh.
  • Manny_CavalierManny_Cavalier Member Posts: 13
    Marc said:
    I use a Linksys EA9300 router that when combined with a Linksys RE9000, becomes a mesh network.  Kind of gives a bit of flexibility where I can keep the RE9000 as a mesh node (or nodes as I add more) with the EA9300 or directly wire the RE9000 and make it an access point.
    RE9000 is a wi-fi extender, right?
  • MarcMarc Member Posts: 313 ✭✭✭✭
    Marc said:
    I use a Linksys EA9300 router that when combined with a Linksys RE9000, becomes a mesh network.  Kind of gives a bit of flexibility where I can keep the RE9000 as a mesh node (or nodes as I add more) with the EA9300 or directly wire the RE9000 and make it an access point.
    RE9000 is a wi-fi extender, right?
    That is correct.  It’s tri band and uses one band as a dedicated backhaul if you have the right Linksys router.  Definitely not as pretty as a google mesh node, but does the job.
    Thats Daphnee, she's a good dog...
    VioletChepil
  • waynerwayner Member Posts: 16
    wayner said:
    I like Ubiquiti Unifi as it provides a really good UI and allows you to see a comprehensive view of your LAN, including WAPs, switches, router, etc - assuming that you buy all Unifi stuff.  Their WAPs are very good and use PoE so it reduces the amount of cabling required.
    Thanks!  But I don't think Unifi is considered as a mesh.
    What is the definition of a mesh?  Unifi allows you to set up multiple WAPs in one system and they can be connected back to your LAN via wired connection or wireless?  Isn't that a mesh?
    I have five Unifi WAPs in and around my house to give me good service.
    VioletChepilHronos
  • VioletChepilVioletChepil London, UKAdministrator Posts: 1,616 admin
    @wayner should we split that one off into a new discussion? Maybe it is a question in its own right. Thoughts?

    Community Manager at Fing

  • waynerwayner Member Posts: 16
    Sure.  Maybe a thread to discuss the merits of mesh vs other (unifi-type) systems.
  • Manny_CavalierManny_Cavalier Member Posts: 13
    Since when did the definition of a wifi mesh network change?  Maybe Google or Wiki can help for a little 101.
    For better understanding, these are the samples of popular wifi mesh network products/brands:
    • Google Wifi
    • Ubiquiti Amplifi
    • Eero
    • Netgear Orbi
    • Asus Lyra
    • Luma
    • Linksys Velop
    • Samsung Connect Home Pro
    • TP-Link Deco
    • Amped

  • gman60gman60 Member Posts: 1
    I’ve been using Netgear Orbi’s for a couple of years now. I love them. Speed is fantastic. Wired gig ports on both the router and satellites. Very handy for some equipment. No problems at all. Covers a lot of area with only one router and one satellite. Over 2400 square feet in a tri level home.  Also hits my entire yard without anything outside. No issues with my Fing v1.
  • StevePSteveP Member Posts: 2
    I have been using the Ubiquiti AmpliFi Mesh Wi-Fi System since February and have had great results.
    kltaylor
  • JohnJohn Member Posts: 67 ✭✭✭
    Ubiquiti seem to be leading in wifi APs and feedback on mesh is good.
    I am looking to use a AP style setup i.e the Ubiquiti ceiling mountable POE devices, however they are not mesh so would this be a step backwards from a BT Whole Home setup?
    Do Ubiquiti (or any other brand for that matter) do a ceiling mountable / POE Mesh wireless system?
    VioletChepilSkrsmal987
  • VioletChepilVioletChepil London, UKAdministrator Posts: 1,616 admin
    @Manny_Cavalier I think it would be great if we could take all these suggestions and start up a new poll. What do you think?
    @John for this one - "Do Ubiquiti (or any other brand for that matter) do a ceiling mountable / POE Mesh wireless system?" - should we start up a new thread? I think we can get some more helpful answers on this one!! 

    Community Manager at Fing

    kltaylor
  • smarkhamsmarkham Member Posts: 3

    I moved from WiFi extenders to a WiFi mesh at home nearly 3 years ago and was the best thing I did. I opted the BT Whole Home WiFi (UK) as it's comes as 1-6 disks and with a initial disk plugging into any router and the other disks backhauls using separate WiFi or Ethernet cables. So didn't need to change my router Client devices are supported using 2.5/5 mghtz. BT do provide a router with added Mesh disks but it's part of a ISP monthly plan. I believe Hughes sell the disks in the USA

    kltaylorKenv
  • SparksSparks Member Posts: 1
    I also use the ASUS AI Mesh, and so far so good.
    kltaylor
  • JazthedjJazthedj Member Posts: 1

    I like Goggle WiFi best. I have used Eero, TP link M5.

    kltaylor
  • SimoneSpinozziSimoneSpinozzi Member Posts: 46 ✭✭✭
    MikroTik, i am not looking anywhere else after trying them.
  • GidsterGidster London, UKMember, Administrator, Moderator Posts: 224 admin
    MikroTik, i am not looking anywhere else after trying them.
    Never heard of them before - I'll look them up
    Head of Product at Fing
    kltaylor
  • Jon_IrishJon_Irish Member Posts: 8 ✭✭
    wayner said:
    I like Ubiquiti Unifi as it provides a really good UI and allows you to see a comprehensive view of your LAN, including WAPs, switches, router, etc - assuming that you buy all Unifi stuff.  Their WAPs are very good and use PoE so it reduces the amount of cabling required.
    Just one thing to keep in mind about Ubiquity UniFi, it really isn't marketed toward the average home user. If you are not comfortable with having to roll up your sleeves and get under the hood, then take a look at the Ubiquity Amplify product.
    kltaylor
  • medvyedmedvyed Member Posts: 3
    edited September 20
    I use Xfinity's mesh network.  It consists of 3-6 xfi Pods that you locate around your house.  The pods are integrated with the Cisco DPCT3941T gateway, so there are no extra SSIDs and the pods are controlled with Xfinity's standard gateway control app.  Very easy to set up and does a great job eliminating wifi dead spots.  The Fing box recognizes the pods as additional access points and protects them as such.
  • AldereteAlderete Member Posts: 4
    • Marco Arment (podcaster, developer) years ago recommended "Ubiquiti for folks who want to fiddle with the technical details, Eero for everyone else." I can't find the tweet, so sorry, no source.
    • Ubiquiti UniFi is a terrific non-mesh solution if you can run Ethernet lines. It's not cheap, and requires some technical skills, but it's enterprise grade Wi-Fi in your home, at a non-enterprise price.
    • Ubiquiti has a couple different mesh solutions. AmpliFi is their version of Eero-like simplicity, and it's supposed to be pretty good.
    • The Wirecutter has recommendations for mesh networking equipment, and specifically talks about Ubiquiti in that context. https://thewirecutter.com/reviews/best-wi-fi-mesh-networking-kits/#what-about-ubiquiti
    Personal recommendation: I've used UniFi for years, and love it. I'm on my third generation of Ubiquiti UniFi products, and will install a 4th generation when they come out with equipment that supports Wi-Fi 6. 
    medvyedVioletChepil
  • JohnJohn Member Posts: 67 ✭✭✭
    I have taken the plunge with a UAP-AC-PRO and love it but can see this getting expensive as I now was a USG and a Unifi POE switch :blush:
    1x AP currently nearly as good as the 3x BT Whole Home Mesh APs!
    kltaylor
  • Long_John_SliverLong_John_Sliver Member Posts: 6
    My limited research suggested eero would be best way to go, so I did, and I'm well satisfied with the system. Three nodes cover the large home nicely, including an adjacent outbuilding.
    HronosGidsterVioletChepilPoohkltaylor
  • PoohPooh Member Posts: 642 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @Long_John_Sliver I've been generally happy with my 3 Eero Pros and so far, apart from one oddity, they've played well with the Fingbox.

    People say nothing is impossible, but I do nothing every day.
    Long_John_SliverVioletChepilkltaylor
  • MarsaresMarsares Member Posts: 1

    I got the Google WiFi with three nodes. Although it’s been a few years old, it’s been absolutely brilliant. I was a bit concerned about it being part of Google, but the privacy settings are good and it’s uptime has been outstanding, as well as the speed.


    it does have some overlap with Fing, as you can pause internet access for devices, check speeds, etc. Fing does a better job of that though, as well as provide an added layer of security, so I run both in parallel.

    VioletChepilkltaylor
  • benabena Member Posts: 6
    I'm using the Tenda mesh, it seems to work fine, I got 3 x MS3 nodes and one MS6 node from ebuyer for £80 inc delivery
    VioletChepil
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