iPhone Exploit, your OS isn't safe either

kltaylorkltaylor Moderator, Beta Tester Posts: 1,189
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edited September 2019 in Devices & Security
As it becomes close and closer to holidays, the criminals are becoming smarter and smarter.
"Over the last week, we learned more about a chain of malicious website exploits that targeted iPhone users for years. This evening, a new report from Vice dives deeper into the current state of the security industry, and how the number of iOS exploits continues to grow."
Please be safe.


"There's a fine line between audacity and idiocy."
-Warden Anastasia Luccio, Captain
VioletChepilHronos

Comments

  • MarcMarc Moderator, Beta Tester Posts: 1,290
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    While NOTHING is 100% secure, iOS and its closed ecosystem is a little bit safer then most mobile OS’s security wise.  Which leads to what you said in one of your other threads...  Keep you mobile os’s up to date and patched.  If your phone or mobile OS is no longer supported with patches by the vendor, think long and hard about keeping it as the unpatched vulnerabilities will keep piling up. 
    Thats Daphnee, she's a good dog...
    PoohHronoseJony
  • KomoKomo Member Posts: 30
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    There is now a way to remotely flash firmware for all iPhones 11 and older. Closed source is NOT secure. It’s actually the most insecure form of software. And I am typing this from a hacked IPhone as we speak lol. The fact that the software is closed has REALLY made it challenging to get rid of the persistent root kit and SIM high hacking that has been done on my phone. Out of all my compromised devices, my IPhone is the worst.

  • eJonyeJony Member, Beta Tester Posts: 45
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    @Komo
    I understand your point. The debate about whether closed source or open source solutions are more secure will rage on, maybe without end. I think @Marc was only pointing out that iOS is pretty secure based on the fact that it isn't easy to load software that hasn't been Apple approved. And while iOS firmware could be broken/hacked for a long time, I wonder if keeping iOS updated (and no one ensures a higher level of upgrade compliance than Apple) reduces the threat surface to iPhone more than anything on other competing platforms.

    It's always a fun debate to discuss which platform is "safest." And safest might mean different things to different people (because everyone has a different level of technical literacy), but I think everyone can agree with @kltaylor's OP that no platform is 100% safe and the highest level of security comes from the right combination of hardware, OS, software, awareness and process.
    Marc
  • MarcMarc Moderator, Beta Tester Posts: 1,290
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    I don’t think the iPhone exploit is as dire as I’m reading in this thread.  From what I just read, you would need physical access to the phone first.  I will say if anyone has unfettered malicious access to your kit, open source or closed, it’s game over.

    “To compromise your iPhone, an attacker would need to have it in his hands physically. The device would need to be connected to a computer and put into DFU (Device Firmware Upgrade) mode in order to exploit it.“

    link here...  https://blog.malwarebytes.com/mac/2019/09/new-ios-exploit-checkm8-allows-permanent-compromise-of-iphones/

    Thats Daphnee, she's a good dog...
    eJonyKomo
  • eJonyeJony Member, Beta Tester Posts: 45
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    @Komo
    Yes, I'm familiar with Checkm8. And as @Marc pointed out it requires physical access and time and effort to Jailbreak the phone. People have been jailbreaking iPhone since the iPhone 3g. Jailbreaking does increase the attack surface of a phone. To jailbreak an Android phone you just check the box in settings to allow installs from non-playstore sources. So in that respect no platform in 100% secure. 
    Marc
  • KomoKomo Member Posts: 30
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    Im actually looking into changing the OS on my iPhone to an Android OS

  • eJonyeJony Member, Beta Tester Posts: 45
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    @Komo,
    That would be cool. Let me know if you find a way to do that. I haven't jailbroken an iPhone in a long time. But I'm not saying that I haven't seen Cydia in action. There are so many ways that the iphone has "opened up" I just wonder if there is the demand that there used to be. Siri shortcuts, Wifi hotspots, 3rd party keyboards, and password manager integration have all made the benefit of jailbreaking an iphone significantly smaller. And since that benefit incurs the increased attack vector risk, I wonder if the cost/benefit of doing it isn't significantly less than it used to be.
  • MarcMarc Moderator, Beta Tester Posts: 1,290
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    @Komo , same here. As far as I know there is no way to swap the OS but I guess never say never? Jail broken used to mean substituting a hacked version of iOS, this would be an interesting twist.

    Thats Daphnee, she's a good dog...
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