How to setup load balancer/fail over home network with 2 ISPs

I have 2 ISPs (cable and fiber) to ensure a very high availability of my home (incl. small business) network. Each ISP has its own modem with build-in wifi, router and dhcp. Currently i  manually plug my network into the active modem, only 1 modem is turned on.
Looking for advice on how to setup my network to use both (not needed for speed but since i pay for them i might as well use them) with auto fail-over and load balancing. 
My idea is to have a dual WAN router like the https://m.routershop.nl/draytek-vigor-2926ac/pid=55391 between my 2 modems and the home network (central 16 channel Cisco switch). The modems would have their wifi turned off. The router will provide wifi and DHCP server for the home network.
Is this a workable setup? Am i i missing things? DNS server settings, modem to router settings/dhcp....???
NB the fiber modem is a Draytec Vigor 2132Fvn, the cable is a Ziggo Connect box.

VioletChepil

Comments

  • Andrea
    Andrea Member, Beta Tester Posts: 43
    25 Likes 10 Comments Name Dropper Photogenic
    ✭✭

    that is a good solution but i suggest a Synology RT2600AC and you can setup Smart wan

    is quick and easy and plus synology have a lot of good addon non just a basic router

    VioletChepil
  • GadgetVirtuoso
    GadgetVirtuoso Member Posts: 21
    10 Comments First Anniversary 5 Likes Founder
    ✭✭✭
    What you're looking for is a router that is capable of handling more than one WAN connection at a time as you already suggested. I'm not familiar with this brand. If you're looking to save money buying a router that is DD-WRT compatible would be a good choice. If you have some money to spend then I would look at a Sonicwall or other entry level enterprise router if you depend on it for your business. A Sonicwall TZ300 or better is pretty robust for this kind of setup and not very expensive.

    As for your current routers from your ISPs, you simply need to put them in bridge mode. Configuring them will depend on what they are exactly. For this to work you need to handle everything at the router that's going to connect all of your devices. You cannot use anything on the ISP provided routers beyond passing the network connection to your new router.
    VioletChepilkltaylorGidsterHronos
  • Mirekmal
    Mirekmal Member, Beta Tester Posts: 68
    10 Comments 25 Likes First Anniversary 5 Awesomes
    ✭✭✭
    I do use Draytek Vigor 2925 currently and it works very well in dual WAN setup - primary WAN is cable modem, secondary/failover is USB stick for LTE modem. So I'd assume it would work in your setup fine as well.
    I also use it with 'fake WAN' (secondary connection to cable modem) and I use this connection specifically for VPN traffic (this way I can monitor VPN traffic bandwidth via SNMP and force specific traffic to go via VPN).
    Drawback of this configuration is that you will do dual NAT - between your ISP and Draytek and then from Draytek to LAN. In most cases this won't create any issues, the only one I face sometimes is systems on LAN cannot detect public IP - they recognize IP of router WAN port, which is in fact LAN from perspective of ISP routers... Draytek itself is capable to properly recognize real public IP - useful for dynamic DNS.
    VioletChepilGidster
  • kltaylor
    kltaylor Member, Beta Tester Posts: 1,231
    1000 Comments 500 Likes 50 Answers 100 Awesomes
    ✭✭✭✭✭✭
    What you're looking for is a router that is capable of handling more than one WAN connection at a time as you already suggested. I'm not familiar with this brand. If you're looking to save money buying a router that is DD-WRT compatible would be a good choice. If you have some money to spend then I would look at a Sonicwall or other entry level enterprise router if you depend on it for your business. A Sonicwall TZ300 or better is pretty robust for this kind of setup and not very expensive.

    As for your current routers from your ISPs, you simply need to put them in bridge mode. Configuring them will depend on what they are exactly. For this to work you need to handle everything at the router that's going to connect all of your devices. You cannot use anything on the ISP provided routers beyond passing the network connection to your new router.
    This is part of the solution that you're looking for.  You need to invest in a router (firewall) that features dual WAN for fail-over events.  Please be aware that firewall devices with this feature will be a bit more expensive than a consumer router would be, and there's typically a yearly subscription that ties with it for IPS and Web security.
    Another way to do this though would be to implement the second router but leave it powered down.  Having two routers on the same network without using advanced subnet plotting will result in erratic behavior which could lead to no service availability.
    With that, install a second LAN card in your desktop, assuming it's not a Mac <ahem>.  Even if this second adapter is a USB to Ethernet adapter, to plug directly into the second modem.  When one network fails, turn on the second and wait a few moments for your machine to recognize the change in connection, and continue on.
    While this may be ideal on a consumer level, one thing that it won't be able to provide is an automatic connection to the second when the first fails, whenever you're away from your home/office.
    "There's a fine line between audacity and idiocy."
    -Warden Anastasia Luccio, Captain
    VioletChepil
  • Romulus
    Romulus Member, Beta Tester Posts: 35
    25 Likes 10 Comments 5 Agrees Photogenic
    ✭✭✭
    I had two ISP's for a while (Cable and DSL for backup). I tried using the dual WAN capability in my DD-WRT router at the time but never did seem to get it working correctly.

    What I ended up doing is leaving both connected all the while but manually switching the default route to the backup gateway when I needed to using a BAT file.

    I ended up ditching the DSL because when I had a service interruption on my Cable the DSL always seemed to go down as well.
    VioletChepil
  • kltaylor
    kltaylor Member, Beta Tester Posts: 1,231
    1000 Comments 500 Likes 50 Answers 100 Awesomes
    ✭✭✭✭✭✭
    Something that just entered into the vast reaches of my mind ... scary as that may be;
    For a backup internet connection, I know that most routers have at least one USB port, and I'm not insanely sure that this will even work, but what about a USB Mobile/Cellular device so that it takes over when you plug it into the router?
    "There's a fine line between audacity and idiocy."
    -Warden Anastasia Luccio, Captain
    VioletChepil
  • GadgetVirtuoso
    GadgetVirtuoso Member Posts: 21
    10 Comments First Anniversary 5 Likes Founder
    ✭✭✭

    On consumer grade router the USB port is usually only active for a USB drive for a network share or a printer. Now if you get an enterprise router some do have this option but the compatible hardware is usually very limited.

    VioletChepil
  • WilliamHill
    WilliamHill Member Posts: 2
    First Comment Photogenic

    Mobile is not my way to go as i already have the backup line physically separated from the main connection so having both fail simultaneously would be rare.

    Thanks all advice I will have to see which dual WAN router fits my budget and requirements and how to set the modems in bridge mode.

    VioletChepil
  • Andrea
    Andrea Member, Beta Tester Posts: 43
    25 Likes 10 Comments Name Dropper Photogenic
    ✭✭
    VioletChepil