How to properly use ping?

CheleAlexa1CheleAlexa1 Member Posts: 6
Photogenic First Comment

Hello,

Just wanted to get the DL on the ping option on the app. Am I doing something wrong when trying to use it? I thought that it was supposed to pinpoint that devices precise location but it not giving me that information... any and all suggestions are appreciated.

Thanks,

CheleAlexa1

CheleAlexa1

Best Answer

Answers

  • CheleAlexa1CheleAlexa1 Member Posts: 6
    Photogenic First Comment

    OK awesome I 2nd it out 30 HD

    CheleAlexa1

  • CheleAlexa1CheleAlexa1 Member Posts: 6
    Photogenic First Comment

    Thank you for the information! it's greatly appreciate!

    CheleAlexa1

    Ciaran
  • CheleAlexa1CheleAlexa1 Member Posts: 6
    Photogenic First Comment


    CheleAlexa1

  • Petes_PubPetes_Pub Member, Beta Tester Posts: 4
    First Comment Photogenic
    I use ping since I have 3 printers, and check with the IP address if there is any packet loss. My next step is to check the print Que. Also handy with WIFI extender[s]
  • JesusChristJesusChrist Member Posts: 1
    First Comment
    Stop Luftes dhe Varferise ne Bote !
  • KatherineAJKatherineAJ Member Posts: 5
    Name Dropper First Comment

    Hello, how do you know what is high and low?

    I see there’s an average, min & max speeds and std deviation.

    Not sure how to interpret the ping information?

    thank you Katherine

    Petes_Pub
  • Petes_PubPetes_Pub Member, Beta Tester Posts: 4
    First Comment Photogenic
    For my purposes I check the packet loss, should be zero! I did try the ping option, I can appreciate what you are saying, the newer version [android phone] is tougher to interpret. I use terminal on my Linux MX to see the results of ping. I just have a small at home network.
    KatherineAJ
  • KatherineAJKatherineAJ Member Posts: 5
    Name Dropper First Comment

    So if we identify there is packet loss, what can we do?

    my s-son is playing Call of Duty and claims my internet is the reason for the glitching yet my download / upload speeds are pretty good 👍🏼

    Petes_Pub
  • Petes_PubPetes_Pub Member, Beta Tester Posts: 4
    First Comment Photogenic
    Hi,
    One thought is as your son mentioned is the ISP is slowing things down. I have added a google wifi booster, this dramatically eased my slowdowns! So if you are both using wifi at the same time, only so much will work at a time!
    My setup is So pretty much I have the ISP router, my smart TV and fing box, and google wifi booster!
  • AlexTheStampedeAlexTheStampede Member Posts: 2
    First Answer First Comment

    Online gaming is, like video calls Skype and so on, quite different from say normal web browsing or watching Netflix because it requires (usually, but that's a whole new hornet nest) less upload/download bandwidth but a reliable connection with no packet loss and a ping as low as possible. There's a good example to help understand what is bandwidth: imagine a highway, there's a speed limit, but it can have many lanes. The speed limit of a connection is always dictated by the laws of physics as the electrical impulses are always going to be the same speed, but adding more lanes (bandwidth) will allow for more cars to travel at the same time and that's how "fast" your connection is. Now, this is relevant because games don't need many "lanes" and as such if you're watching Netflix smooth as butter but at the same time Call of Duty is not doing well, the two things aren't mutually exclusive! So, what can you do? First, is the console or computer used to play connected via wire? That excludes any issues with your network and puts the ball in the hands of your internet provider, but if it's connected via Wi-Fi try putting the phone nearby and ping the router... ideally there should be no packet loss at all, and the ping would be a low number with as little deviation as possible. This isn't a surefire way to test however, because the phone has a different antenna and radio. Not much to do about it if it's a console, trying to get it closer to the router would help, if the games are better then at least you know where the problem is. If it's a computer however, it has a built in ping software! However it's via command line and that's not great from the point of view of ease of use. Given how it's slightly different depending on the OS, I'll let you Google that (say something like "windows 10 ping") but remember that you need to input the ip address of your router for this test, so it might be worth to write it down as shown in Fing. A thing worth mentioning is how everyone stresses how you should use the 5ghz Wi-Fi instead of the 2.4ghz one because it has less interference (and it IS true! 2.4ghz is used by Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, cordless phones, microwave ovens, generic "wireless" stuff and so on) but what nobody ever points out, is that it has a shorter range and obstacles absorb it more! There's a reason if short wave radios can travel continents and are at a much, much lower frequency than Wi-Fi. Anyway if it's impossible to get the gaming machine closer to the router, there's options such as powerline adapters that can work wonders or barely at all (in my experience at least), Wi-Fi extenders that also work but the way they do it makes my blood curl, there's a Wi-Fi up link that usually isn't cheap or easy to setup and mine works so well that I play online without any hiccups (I use two Unifi AP pro, nowadays considered a legacy product... https://www.ui.com/unifi/unifi-ap/ ), there's the fancy new option to get some mesh network devices... and then there's the cheap but ugly alternative: an ethernet wire, always the best option where possible.


    This is way outside of the scope of this whole discussion, however one thing that helps keeping the connection going smoothly no matter what, is a proper gateway. Last time I checked there was free and powerful but extremely difficult to understand, or paid and powerful but reasonably easy to use, so for example pf sense as opposed to Untangle. This stuff runs on a dedicated computer and manages the network, specifically it can prioritize traffic! When set up properly, it allows to use the connection so that time sensitive data (again, for example gaming and video chat) will be let through immediately, while other things like a download or Netflix will take a step back and the beauty of this is that nobody notices anything wrong or unusual with the connection.


    As a small side note, uh, there's the good old blaming it on the tool. Particularly younger players can have a tendency to blame the connection when a more experienced opponent does something apparently impossible. Not saying this is the case, but if you could watch a few games while keeping an eye on stuttering, people teleporting around and any visible network quality icons on screen (not familiar with Call of Duty, but there might be a bar icon like the phone signal), it would be good to know if you are going to be troubleshooting a network issue that isn't really there.

    Petes_Pub
  • Petes_PubPetes_Pub Member, Beta Tester Posts: 4
    First Comment Photogenic
    In conclusion, we have come light-years since 56k modems...
Sign In or Register to comment.