How to identify which network a device is connected to?

AustinJerryAustinJerry Member Posts: 72
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I have two WiFi networks in my home, a 2.4Ghz network and a 5GHz network.  I would like to know which network a device is currently connected to.  To demonstrate the issue I am having, I am using Fing on an iPAD connected to the 5GHz network.  Take one device, for example, an AppleTV device configured for a wireless connection.  When I look at the properties for the AppleTV in Fing, it shows that it is connected to the 2.4Ghz network, when it is actually on the 5GHz network.  Same for my TV—it shows as being connected to the 2.4Ghz network, when it really is on the 5GHz network.   Is there a way to accurately show my devices by which network they are connected to?
Fingbox owner from the beginning
kltaylor

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  • kltaylorkltaylor Moderator, Beta Tester Posts: 1,231
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    Thank you for the clarification @AustinJerry, unfortunately I am not well versed with Apple/Mac products.  I can only tell you what I have first-hand experience with, in that my smart TV and IoT devices all use the 24Ghz network (and I have a Tri-Band router).
    Also, I found this by using a Google search to help clarify my comment about wireless bands:
    "The primary differences between the two frequencies are the range (coverage) and bandwidth (speed) that the bands provide. The 2.4 GHz band provides coverage at a longer range but transmits data at slower speeds. The 5 GHz band provides less coverage but transmits data at faster speeds."
    If your Apple TV has the capability to support 5Ghz band, and is close to the router, it is feasible to use the 5Ghz band, however I still recommend using the 2.4 specifically for consistency (not receiving dropped signal due to strength).
    If I misunderstood your question then I apologize for that.  I understood the question to ask if there is a way that the Fing app can provide which WiFi band a particular device is connected to.
    My response to that is No, you can verify what band the device is connected on the actual device itself.

    "There's a fine line between audacity and idiocy."
    -Warden Anastasia Luccio, Captain

Answers

  • kltaylorkltaylor Moderator, Beta Tester Posts: 1,231
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    Hi @AustinJerry thanks for asking your question.
    I would fathom to guess that the smart appliances will connect to the 2.4 Ghz simply because it would be more stable of a connection, then attempting to connect to the 5Ghz.
    Meaning, 5Ghz is stronger the closer your are to the router, losing strength as you move away from it versus the 2.4Ghz network would.
    I'm guessing that both of your wireless AP's share the same SSID?  For the sake of a 'smart home', I would seperate the SSID names accordingly, and only use the 5Ghz band the closer your are to the actual router.
    "There's a fine line between audacity and idiocy."
    -Warden Anastasia Luccio, Captain
  • AustinJerryAustinJerry Member Posts: 72
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    I am talking about devices that I specifically connect to the 5Ghz, and which show as connected to that network when I check the device configuration.  The devices are showing strong wireless signal strength.  And my two wireless networks have different SSID's.

    So, while I appreciate your response, my question remains unanswered.
    Fingbox owner from the beginning
    kltaylor
  • kltaylorkltaylor Moderator, Beta Tester Posts: 1,231
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    edited April 2020
    I have two WiFi networks in my home, a 2.4Ghz network and a 5GHz network.  I would like to know which network a device is currently connected to.  To demonstrate the issue I am having, I am using Fing on an iPAD connected to the 5GHz network.  Take one device, for example, an AppleTV device configured for a wireless connection.  When I look at the properties for the AppleTV in Fing, it shows that it is connected to the 2.4Ghz network, when it is actually on the 5GHz network.  Same for my TV—it shows as being connected to the 2.4Ghz network, when it really is on the 5GHz network.   Is there a way to accurately show my devices by which network they are connected to?
    Your network list will not show which device is connected to their respective WiFi bands.  Fing app and Fingbox will only show that the device is connected to the Network, not their respective WiFi SSID's or bands.
    The only method that you can use to check the device and which band it's connected to, would be to look on the wireless information on that device.
    As I mentioned earlier, your SmartTV should only connect to the 2.4Ghz band, like any other 'Smart' devices that you have in your home.  I hope that I answered your question.
    "There's a fine line between audacity and idiocy."
    -Warden Anastasia Luccio, Captain
  • AustinJerryAustinJerry Member Posts: 72
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    There are two errors in your response.  First of all, if I look at device properties for my AppleTV, there is a section titled "WiFi signal", and it shows the 2.4Ghz network SSID and its signal strength, although the device is actually connected to the 5Ghz network.  Second, I don't know why you keep saying that my smart TV should connect to the 2.4Ghz network when I manually connect it to the 5Ghz network.
    Fingbox owner from the beginning
  • AustinJerryAustinJerry Member Posts: 72
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    You have answered my question, i.e. the Fing app cannot tell which network a device is using.  On a side note, I find this curious, since when I open the administrative interface to my wireless router (Asus RT-AC87U), there is a column title "Interface", which clearly identifies each device as being connected directly to the router, or connected to the 2.4Ghz or 5Ghz networks.  I was under the assumption, perhaps falsely, that the Fing app could access configuration data directly from the router.
    And back on the topic of smart devices connecting to a wireless network:  as far as I know, a user must actually configure network connectivity.  Typically this is done in the device's network menu, where available wireless network SSID's are displayed, and the user manually selects an SSID and enters the password.  Assuming adequate signal strength, both the 2.4Ghz and the 5Ghz SSID's would typically be displayed.  Of course I agree with you that selecting either the 2.4Ghz or the 5Ghz network depends on where the device is located, and the relative signal strengths of the two network choices.  Keep in mind that if the 5Ghz is strong enough, it will deliver significantly faster throughput, which is important if the device is being used for streaming.
    Fingbox owner from the beginning
  • kltaylorkltaylor Moderator, Beta Tester Posts: 1,231
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    5Ghz would indeed be faster for streaming, for sure.  Would take a bit less time for the buffer to reach an adequate viewing experience.
    No Fing app doesn't take information from the router, it connects to the wireless band with the password that you enter and issues an SNMP to all IP addresses within the subnet.  Whatever responds is then displayed, from there you can edit the information listed to personalize what the devices are in the list.
    "There's a fine line between audacity and idiocy."
    -Warden Anastasia Luccio, Captain
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