Which router??

DanVDanV Member Posts: 13
10 Comments Name Dropper Photogenic

Hi

Please could somebody advise on a compatible router with modem for Fingbox in the UK.

My current router does not have the functionality to switch between ipv6 and 4.

This is driving me insane!!

Thank you in advance.

Answers

  • DanVDanV Member Posts: 13
    10 Comments Name Dropper Photogenic
    Please could somebody assist by recommending a suitable router (with built in modem), to replace my BT 'Smart' Hub - I am unable to utilise all functions due to not being able to  switch off pv6.
    Any help would be gratefully received.
    Many thanks.
  • DanVDanV Member Posts: 13
    10 Comments Name Dropper Photogenic
    ipv6
  • DanVDanV Member Posts: 13
    10 Comments Name Dropper Photogenic

    Can anybody help with this please?

  • DanVDanV Member Posts: 13
    10 Comments Name Dropper Photogenic

    Anybody there?

  • DanVDanV Member Posts: 13
    10 Comments Name Dropper Photogenic

    Appreciate all of the responses provided - very disappointing 😒

  • MarcMarc Moderator, Beta Tester Posts: 1,350
    100 Answers 1000 Comments 500 Likes 100 Awesomes
    ✭✭✭✭✭✭
    edited April 15
    Hi @DanV, no ipv6?  It’s time to upgrade, though not necessarily for ipv6.  Most modern routers have features like mesh, more up to date software and wireless standards And speed upgrade that alone make the upgrade worthwhile.  Ipv6 for consumers have very little benefit at this time but of course that could change some day.

    A few things to ask you.  How big is your house or flat?  Do you have multiple floors ?  How many square feet?  What type of devices do you have on your network.

    Now when it comes to ipv6 and Fingbox, there are a few things to keep in mind.  A feature or two will not work due to the way ipv6 works like device pause.  If that’s not a concern your all set.  If they are you could stay on ipv4 to keep them.  All recent routers support both standards.

    (I moved this to the network infrastructure section for relevance)
    Thats Daphnee, she's a good dog...
    AlbertK
  • DanVDanV Member Posts: 13
    10 Comments Name Dropper Photogenic
    Hi @Marc,
    Thank you for responding to my query - I really appreciate it
    At present, I have a BT Hub router which has this ipv6 setting that cannot be affected. One of the main purposes of the  Fingbox purchase was to allow screening and control for my children's devices and to enable the application of some routine to internet access.
    All I really need is somebody with knowledge to advise on a suitable router with modem that functions efficiently with the Fingbox and then I will be happy.
    The house is a four bed detached, across two floors and circa 2,000 sq feet. The BT Hub has managed adequately but is just preventing the full benefits of the Fingbox. The devices on the network are four consoles, five mobile phones, Philips hue bridge, TV box, four alexa devices and multiple laptops.
    Thanks again for your help.

    Kind Regards,

    Dan.

  • MarcMarc Moderator, Beta Tester Posts: 1,350
    100 Answers 1000 Comments 500 Likes 100 Awesomes
    ✭✭✭✭✭✭
    Understood...  In order to use Fingbox for control of your kids devices, you will have to remain at ipv4 only.  If that affects your need for a new modem/router, please keep that in mind.

    @Robin , since I am in the states and not too familiar with BT modem/router requirements, would you be able to add anything?  @Albert same to you.
    Thats Daphnee, she's a good dog...
  • RobinRobin Administrator Posts: 2,363
    100 Answers 1000 Comments 250 Likes 25 Agrees
    admin
    Thanks @Marc
    I haven't got enough information regarding BT modem. All I can tell is that The way the Fingbox works is through ARP poisoning and DNS Spoofing.  So what is happening is that when you block a single device, the computer DHCP address and DNS entries gets changed and pointed to the Fingbox.  So this device is blocked from getting to the internet or internal resources. 

     
    For more information on ARP poisoning and DNS Spoofing see the following links: 
    Blocking is done by DNS/Blocking Spoofing. 
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DNS_blocking 
     
    The Fingbox/App work to pause things by a process called ARP poisoning/Blocking. 
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IP_address_spoofing 
     
    Things that need to be done to make sure that it is going to work are as follows: 
    1. Enable UPnP on your router 
    2. Disable IPv6 on your router (This is required to make sure that Internet Pause and Blocking works) 
    3. Best Practice - Reserve the IP address of the Fingbox 
    4. Create the following TCP rules and point them to the IP address of the Fingbox 
     

    • 80 (Internet Speed Test) 

    • 443 (Fing Service and Software Updates) 

    • 3001, 3002, 3003 (Internet Speed Test) 

    • 4443 (Fing Service) 

    • 5671 (Fing Diagnostics) 

     

    Robin (Admin at Fing)
    Getting Started? Please refer to Community guidelines & Community User Guides("Helping Hand"). HAPPY POSTING!!!
  • DanVDanV Member Posts: 13
    10 Comments Name Dropper Photogenic

    Thanks guys, appreciate your help.

    As I am unable to disable ipv6 on my router, can anybody recommend a router with modem that definitely allows the capability of pausing / scheduling pauses for devices?

  • MarcMarc Moderator, Beta Tester Posts: 1,350
    100 Answers 1000 Comments 500 Likes 100 Awesomes
    ✭✭✭✭✭✭
    Lets try to flip this a bit... @DanV,  could you download and share a list of Router/modem combo's that are approved for BT and maybe we could let you know which we would recommend?
    Thats Daphnee, she's a good dog...
    Robin
  • DanVDanV Member Posts: 13
    10 Comments Name Dropper Photogenic
  • DanVDanV Member Posts: 13
    10 Comments Name Dropper Photogenic

    @Marc


    Hi there, is there any possibility that somebody could please confirm if any of the listed routers are compatible?


    Many thanks in advance.

  • MarcMarc Moderator, Beta Tester Posts: 1,350
    100 Answers 1000 Comments 500 Likes 100 Awesomes
    ✭✭✭✭✭✭
    Lets get some crowd sources knowledge to bear...  @Robin , @rooted , @Pixelpopper, @Ciaran ...  Any of you recommend, especially those in the UK?  
    Thats Daphnee, she's a good dog...
    DanV
  • PixelpopperPixelpopper Moderator Posts: 129
    100 Comments 25 Likes First Anniversary Member of the Month
    ✭✭✭
    @DanV hi Dan, I have a BT smart hub and you should be able to enable/disable IPV6. However I am running Fing/Fingbox with both IPV4/6 active and have not had any problems. See screenshots:-





    DanV
  • DanVDanV Member Posts: 13
    10 Comments Name Dropper Photogenic
    Hi @Pixelpopper @Marc
    Thank you both for taking the time to assist in resolving.

    Unfortunately, I have checked the settings and all is as in the images provided. However, I am still unable to use the pause internet function :-(
    Kind Regards,

    Dan.
  • PixelpopperPixelpopper Moderator Posts: 129
    100 Comments 25 Likes First Anniversary Member of the Month
    ✭✭✭
    @DanV I’m not sure I follow, could you screenshot the page that’s not working for you & post here. I presume by “pause internet” you mean “schedule internet?”
  • DanVDanV Member Posts: 13
    10 Comments Name Dropper Photogenic
    Hi @Pixelpopper
    Basically, every time I block a device, attempt to pause internet or equally, schedule an internet pause - everything appears to be set correctly within the app, but the devices in question continue to operate via the internet.

    Kind Regards,

    Dan.
  • DanVDanV Member Posts: 13
    10 Comments Name Dropper Photogenic
    Hi @Pixelpopper @Marc
    Have just reset the fingbox and now I able to block, pause and schedule pauses. The children have immediately relocated their manners.
    Thanks so much for your help guys.


    MarcRobinAlbertK
  • AlbertKAlbertK Member Posts: 28
    10 Comments Photogenic 5 Likes Name Dropper
    Only just saw this now..... and it is solved I see,. Being in Ireland cannot meaningfully comment on the BT Hub... but find ASUS routers amongst the most reliable units.  They will allow Dan to control the children's access as he sees fit.
    Am running the AC RT88U ASUS router here for the last two years...Was top of the line two years ago and i.m.o is still amongst the best... one of the very few with 8 (EIGHT) LAN ports.
    Dan... am glad its solved... IP4 addresses are running out. The kids must mind their manners now! <Smile>
    Albert
  • PixelpopperPixelpopper Moderator Posts: 129
    100 Comments 25 Likes First Anniversary Member of the Month
    ✭✭✭
    AlbertK said:
    ... IP4 addresses are running out..
    @DanV You’re right, the wide area networks, globally, are running out of IPV4 addresses. Fortunately that won’t be an issue for LANs in a domestic environment unless the domestic LAN has a few billion devices connected. At present it’s not certain what role IPV6 will play in the home.
  • AlbertKAlbertK Member Posts: 28
    10 Comments Photogenic 5 Likes Name Dropper
    edited May 24
    Pixelpopper  can you explain why domestic LANS are not affected???  Am not an internet expert. As far as I know.... with the NETMASK set at 255.255.255.0 I can have 254 devices on my local LAN. Am I right in guessing that within a LOCAl LAN IP addresses are sort of irrelevant ?  The whole world seems to run their local lans on 192.168.1.xxxx   or something very similar and as these addresses are contained WITHIN the LOCAL LAN they can be identical across the globe ? Correct ?
    Many thanks...
    Albert
  • PixelpopperPixelpopper Moderator Posts: 129
    100 Comments 25 Likes First Anniversary Member of the Month
    ✭✭✭
    edited May 24
    @AlbertK domestic LANS are affected, in as much as devices capable of using IPV6 are also assigned an address in addition to an IPV4 one. The SubNetwork Mask directly relates to the range of IP addresses available so, 255.255.255.0 = 192.168.1.0 to 192.168.1.255 so you are correct that the theoretical availability is 254 addresses, however the router manufacturer will reserve some addresses for router access, sometimes a small ranges of addresses. E.G. To access and configure a router, manufacturers commonly use 192.168.1.0 or 192.168.1.254. If you needed more addresses in your LAN you could increase the range but it can become complicated. Manufacturers generally stick to the “standard” of 192.168.x.x for domestic IP addresses.
    If you multiply up the Subnets for available ipv4 addresses the total of available addresses = 4 294 967 296 (2 to the power of 32, 32 bit system). When you think of the number of users in the world wide network it becomes apparent that (with a global population of 7 000 000 000+) we would already run out of addresses if every being had a network connection.
    IPV6 offers a theoretical 340,282,366,920,938,463,463,374,607,431,768,211,456 (2 to the power of 128, 128 bit system) number of addresses, I’ll leave it to you to put that number into words, but the available address range is massive.
    This is an over-simplification but hopefully gives an idea of the need for IPV6. There are many resources online if you want to get into the theory, one of which is:- https://tinyurl.com/Ipaddress-theory
    Happy reading.
    Marc
  • AlbertKAlbertK Member Posts: 28
    10 Comments Photogenic 5 Likes Name Dropper
    @Pixelpopper Thank you for that detailed and comprehensive reply !!! Much appreciated. " to the power of 128" we are starting to talk units used in astronomy here. Yes, will have a go at the article... it will probably burn out this 75 year old mind and am grateful to you for posting that link.
    Albert

Sign In or Register to comment.