802.11AX (Alias WiFi 6), versus what we use now. ( N & AC ?) Your thoughts pls?

AlbertAlbert Member Posts: 77
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Folks.... Am curious. Is anyone on this forum using the 802.11AX (WiFi 6) protocol in their routers ? If so.... which of your devices are 802.11AX capable for your router to talk to ?? The only benefit I can sofar see of the AX standard that it will operate on the 2.4GHz band, as well as the 5GHz band.  I am having to support a lot of wireless kit here (even though yours truly was long ago sold on the idea of hard-wiring anything that has an RJ45 connector on it.
For me, having to buy a new Router just to support AX just does not seem worth it, as many devices will not support it anyway... most of 'em won't even support the 5GHz band. As a long-term radio ham... one thing you learn quickly... the higher the frequency, the more the environment ( walls.. buildings, forests) start causing you trouble. To get to their submarines.... while underwater, ELF is used by most navy's , but the data rate on the Extra Low Frequency transmissions is very slow).
So.... lets hear your thoughts  please... are you an early adopter of WiFi 6 ??
Albert

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  • MarcMarc Posts: 892
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    Hey @Albert, my opinion on this is that its just too early to adopt, really expensive and the clients that can take advantage are far and few.  Might be a different story a year from now of course but nothing pushing anyone to adopt now.  
    Thats Daphnee, she's a good dog...
    AlbertWuratoo99
  • AlbertAlbert Posts: 77
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    Marc, fully agree. it looks like at this time AX is ahead of its time.  I also note that the ASUS router  (88U) has very mixed reviews. So... back to running more cables. Its a bit like the 10GB network scene. Would love to run that here... but it would require upgrading a lot of kit as most is not 10GB capable. It will all be available in heaven I have been told. <Smile).
    Marc
  • Wuratoo99Wuratoo99 Posts: 2
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    Pleasure @Albert , for the record I am not on the N-Base-T bandwagon either, for wireless at least 1GB will be sufficient until 802.11be comes around in 6+years. For your NAS if you have the budget but probably wait for pricing to become normalized.

  • rootedrooted Gulf Coast, USPosts: 641
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    I'm actually in favor of AX, the client devices are inexpensive in part I think to improve adoption rate. You can get an Intel based AX200 card for $15, the routers are prohibitively expensive but truthfully so are all upper crust consumer routers.

    I have high bandwidth needs in my home and have around 30 wireless devices which saturates 2.4 and 5ghz among the fact I live in a condo community with way too many APs in range. I also have Gigabit WAN which isn't fully utilized with 5ghz.

    For the average consumer there is no reason to consider AX except for those suffering from congestion and/or need wireless access to 1+ Gbps WAN.

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  • Wuratoo99Wuratoo99 Member Posts: 2
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    Hi Albert


    With the standard not yet ratified it's definitely too early, there are already a lot of issues with drivers especially Intel. 802.11ax is designed to alleviate challenges in very dense wireless environments, not necessarily home or SMB markets, a well designed 802.11g network can still run circles around an ax network, it all depends on your environment. As a wireless engineer I won't make the jump yet and still design for 802.11ac wave 2 networks as I believe ax is still a long way out. Legacy devices are still very prominent so any advantages will be nominal to non existent. Only once a network has above 30% ax client will any benefit start to be felt. Ignore the hype and stick to basics on wifi and you should be fine. Only recommendation fromy side is SMB wireless routers tend to be very crappy, invest in some decent second hand Enterprise gear wherever possible.

    Albert
  • AlbertAlbert Member Posts: 77
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    Wuratoo99  THANK YOU SO VERY MUCH.  It is what I felt in my Gut. Also.... I properly cabled device would be my very first choice... 2.4GHz is so overloaded . I know 5GHz is a bit better but there are still plenty devices out there that will (still) not support that band ! I've been an ASUS Router person for years but their AX unit is getting a lot of negative comments.  I think for now... back to the Keystones and Cat6 or 6a will do the trick. I might upgrade the switch (TP Link) to a Netgear one that can handle Fastethernet, 1GB, 2.5GB, 5 and 10. But it will require a new NIC card and my old Synology NAS cant handle it. 
    Thanks again... really appreciate the feedback.  @Wuratoo99
  • AlbertAlbert Member Posts: 77
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    That is a sound suggestion. Never (yet) heard about .11be ?   any idea what that will bring ? Used to run my Ham Radio kit in the 1300Mhz band... but that is as high as i have ever been. Those were the good old days. ( Long ago... and far away). Am still holding my Class A Irish Call sign... EI7II
    Now I look after 122 animals at the sanctuary I run for abandoned and unwanted companion animals. Used to be able to send and receive Morse code... with the end of the world coming near... that ye olde skill might come in handy again??? <Smile>.
    Albert
  • AlbertAlbert Member Posts: 77
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    edited March 23
    Rooted, as usual... great comment. I was not aware that you could get an AX PCI card.  Will file that away... as I might need one one day. Keep Safe. Albert   I've copied @Wuratoo99 as he is a microwave engineer and might  find this useful too. @Marc
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