The FCC has no idea how many people don’t have broadband access

Pooh
Pooh Member, Beta Tester Posts: 674
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From the "Water is wet" department, shocking news that should surprise few folk here in the United States, a consulting firm called "CostQuest Associates" submitted a report to the FCC Tuesday, that paints a far bleaker picture of Broadband America than had been previously admitted.

Now, What Ajit Pai intends to do about this (other than nothing) is up for debate.


People say nothing is impossible, but I do nothing every day.
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keithVioletChepilMarc

Comments

  • keith
    keith Member, Beta Tester Posts: 64
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    The article sounds familiar, only the great USA can stuff something up so much better than everywhere else.
    Monoplies do have some positives when it comes to a broadband rollout.
    Many think our $50B effort is a disaster, they have used fftp, fttn, fttk, fw and the woeful satelite.
    Supposed to be complete next year I think, only 25M people though.
    If you have not got a wired connection in the next 12 months, you will never have one imo, what do you think?
    VioletChepilPoohMarc
  • joltdude
    joltdude Member, Beta Tester Posts: 34
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    In the us... Least in my area its a duopoly for broadband and i use the term loosely... Where I am, the "choice" for reasonable priced broadband access is Comcast or Verizon ... and by Verizon's offering i mean DSL, not VDSL or DSL 2.... 3mb is the top speed... If you went with cellular you have a few more options but the cost goes up dramatically and it is not a viable option for general home broadband access.... or satellite... so yes its often a Monopoly... Thats why when someone says "cutting the cord" .... most of the time they cannot completely or truly "cut the cord" since their ISP is the cable company.... 
    Poohkltaylor
  • Marc
    Marc Moderator, Beta Tester Posts: 2,660
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    I love the term cutting the cord.  In my area if you remove the cable tv piece from the bundle, and add back a channel or two via the web, your already way past the savings of cord cutting to begin with.  And now you have broadcasters moving from Netflix or Amazon and coming up with their own internet channel packages. More money to spend?  I think I’ve just about reached my limit.  
    Thats Daphnee, she's a good dog...
    Pooh
  • Stratt3000
    Stratt3000 NB, CanadaMember Posts: 21
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    It's an issue here as well on the Canadian East Coast.  A lot of rural customers have a fiberop line running right past their house that ends at say a community firehall or other service but they cannot access the services themselves?  With more and more forcing bundles on customers - I think the only way to save these days is to scratch your home phone, dump your TV for something IOT like Roku, Amazon Fire, etc.. and sniff the planet for good cell phone deals.
    Rev. Stratton Phillips | FOSN, D. Div. (h.c.) | InfoTech @ Cloud5

  • kltaylor
    kltaylor Member, Beta Tester Posts: 1,231
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    Pooh said:

    From the "Water is wet" department, shocking news that should surprise few folk here in the United States, a consulting firm called "CostQuest Associates" submitted a report to the FCC Tuesday, that paints a far bleaker picture of Broadband America than had been previously admitted.

    Now, What Ajit Pai intends to do about this (other than nothing) is up for debate.


    Wait ... so you're saying that Ajit Pai, who was appointed as the FCC head-honcho has no idea how a decision that he led, and was successful with, how the data is inaccurate, by an incredible margin?
    With today's administration firmly in mind, I say to ye:
    "You don't say?!"
    "There's a fine line between audacity and idiocy."
    -Warden Anastasia Luccio, Captain
  • kltaylor
    kltaylor Member, Beta Tester Posts: 1,231
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    joltdude said:
    In the us... Least in my area its a duopoly for broadband and i use the term loosely... Where I am, the "choice" for reasonable priced broadband access is Comcast or Verizon ... and by Verizon's offering i mean DSL, not VDSL or DSL 2.... 3mb is the top speed... If you went with cellular you have a few more options but the cost goes up dramatically and it is not a viable option for general home broadband access.... or satellite... so yes its often a Monopoly... Thats why when someone says "cutting the cord" .... most of the time they cannot completely or truly "cut the cord" since their ISP is the cable company.... 
    I also wonder though .. with the advent of DNS over HTTPS/TLS ... how many folks are veiling their connections in stark contrast to the FCC killing Net Neutrality?!
    Are more people starting to put together that their service should be their business?
    "There's a fine line between audacity and idiocy."
    -Warden Anastasia Luccio, Captain