Tips for identifying generic devices

rbmcnrbmcn Member Posts: 1
Photogenic
edited August 2019 in Fing App
Hello all.  Newby here😱.  My scans show all my known devices plus 3 or 4 unknown unidentifiable “generic” devices.  Is this a problem- should I be suspicious?  Grateful for advice.  Cheers.
Bruce
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  • VioletChepilVioletChepil London, UKMember Posts: 2,471
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    no this isn't a problem! Are you using iOS 11 and above? If so, there is an issue with MAC address identification. https://help.fing.com/knowledge-base/cant-fing-see-mac-addresses-ios-11/
    The Fing App discovery will identify devices on a best effort basis, based on the information made available by the device, e.g. the MAC address. There are numerous reasons why the device might not be recognized correctly e.g. 
    - Limited information being offered by specific devices. 
     -Location Permissions are not enabled for Fing App.
    Could you make sure all devices are connected to your network on which the Fing App is currently connected to? If you are connected to the 5ghz network and Fing is connected to the 2.4ghz network even though they all have the same name, you might not see the devices connected under the Device tab. And, if the router has multiple network interface which provides multiple frequencies(2.4Ghz and 5Ghz), and the devices are able to connect to multiple access points then you will see multiple names but only one will be active at a time and others will be greyed out.

    Community Manager at Fing

  • AustinJerryAustinJerry Member Posts: 44
    10 Comments 5 Agrees 5 Likes Photogenic
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    Several tips that might help you identify the unknown devices.  Let’s assume that the devices are actually performing a function in your home.  Try setting the option to receive an an alert when the device goes offline.  Then if/when the device goes offline, you will be able to identify it.  Also try restricting internet access for the device and see if any of your devices lose functionality.
    Fingbox owner from the beginning
    VioletChepilBobobenben
  • CrowgrandfatherCrowgrandfather Member, Beta Tester Posts: 62
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    It's also important to note that some devices will randomize the MAC address every time the device connects. Google pixel devices have this set as the default.


    These devices will show up as generic.

    VioletChepilvulcansheart
  • VioletChepilVioletChepil London, UKMember Posts: 2,471
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    I've modified this title to "tips for identifying generic devices". thanks at @Crowgrandfather and @AustinJerry. Hopefully we can get some more user tips as well to build out these tips! 

    Community Manager at Fing

  • Danie1TheDevDanie1TheDev Member Posts: 2
    Name Dropper First Comment

    Hello, Some person is connecting on my WiFi router and when I keep on deleting the device, it goes back in, and I don’t know what to do, I don’t how to auto kick it but I saw a comment that you can. Can you help me out? Thanks

  • CiaranCiaran Administrator Posts: 855
    500 Comments 25 Answers 100 Likes 25 Agrees
    admin
    @Danie1TheDev, do you have a Fingbox? You can do this using a Fingbox but not by solely using the Fing App
    Ciaran (Admin at Fing)
    Getting Started? Please refer to Community guidelines & Community User Guides("Helping Hand"). HAPPY POSTING!!!
  • Danie1TheDevDanie1TheDev Member Posts: 2
    Name Dropper First Comment

    No I don’t, but is there a way to permanently stop a user from going into my routers WiFi?

  • AustinJerryAustinJerry Member Posts: 44
    10 Comments 5 Agrees 5 Likes Photogenic
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    No I don’t, but is there a way to permanently stop a user from going into my routers WiFi?

    Well, in order to gain access to your network, the unknown user must know 1) your SSID, and 2) your WiFi password.  Since broadcasting open SSID’s is general practice, the remaining access-blocker is the WIFi password.  This unknown user must know your password, or is accessing a “guest network” that might have a lax password.  The first thing you should do is change your WiFi password, regardless of how painful that might be.  If you absolutely don’t want to do this, then go into the Fing app, locate the device, and click “Block device”.


    Fingbox owner from the beginning
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