Second router showed up on my network/changed my gateway.

NetNoob63NetNoob63 Member Posts: 5
First Comment

I had a second router show up in my network last week. Fing shows it as router.asus.com just like my real router. IP address 192.168.1.1 but the MAC says 00:90:4C:X:X:X with the MAC vender Epigram/android. I reset my router and things went back to normal but now it’s back as a gateway. Now it has Gateway 192.168.1.1 (00:90:4C:X:X:X) then under that it has Trusted gateway with my Asus MAC bc:EE:7B:X:X:X.

Any help is very appreciated. I’m kinda new to networking but not computers. Thank you

Stopingads

Best Answer

  • NetNoob63NetNoob63 Member Posts: 5
    First Comment
    Accepted Answer

    Kltaylor Thank you for your help. I’m still learning what to and what not to worry about. I was wondering if the second MAC might be the modem. Always something new to learn. Thanks again.

Answers

  • kltaylorkltaylor Moderator, Beta Tester Posts: 1,191
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    Hi @NetNoob63, welcome to our community.

    First, I love the name. =)

    Since these are both Asus routers, the first thing that comes to my mind is the possibility of them being connected for AI Mesh networking.  Is this device powered on and in use in your home at all?
    "There's a fine line between audacity and idiocy."
    -Warden Anastasia Luccio, Captain
    NetNoob63
  • NetNoob63NetNoob63 Member Posts: 5
    First Comment
    edited February 3

    Thank you Kltaylor,

    There should only be one router on my network. Just the Asus RT N53 MAC bc:EE:7B:X:X:X. The second router has a MAC of 00:90:4C:X:X:X with the vender Epigram/Android. After resetting the router it only shows up as a gateway

  • kltaylorkltaylor Moderator, Beta Tester Posts: 1,191
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    @NetNoob63, I love screenshots.

    I think that our confusion exists because of the BSSID MAC address versus the SSID of the communication device itself.

    "Basic Service Set Identifiers (BSSID)

    A service set consists of a group of wireless network devices which operates with the same parameters of networking. Basic service set identifiers (BSSID) is used to describe sections of a wireless local area network or WLAN.[1] It recognizes the access point or router because it has a unique address which creates the wireless network. BSSID identifies the basic service sets that are 48-bit labels and conforms to MAC-48 conventions. Most of the time it is associated with MAC address of the AP. The information will be sent in the AP beacon but it cannot be seen by any other user unless he has an analyzer or tools. Thus, BSSID is simply the MAC address of a wireless access point or also known as WAP."

    (Source)

    I'd say that I think you have a great eye for perception, so good catch and thank you for asking the question.  With the aforementioned context, the two MAC addresses are in essence acting as one device.  I believe that you're 'safe' and have nothing to worry about in regard to the dual MAC addresses.
    "There's a fine line between audacity and idiocy."
    -Warden Anastasia Luccio, Captain
    NetNoob63
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