Troubleshooting WIFI connectivity / packet loss?

There is a particular game I play that if I'm on WIFI, even though I'm literally sitting within about 6 feet of the router, will drop me if I'm playing an online opponent very regularly. So much so that I have to often turn off WIFI on my phone and play with LTE, even though I only have 1 bar of signal, I almost never get dropped when on LTE.  This tells me something weird is going on on my home network. How can I troubleshoot if I'm dealing with packet loss or something else that's causing me not to maintain a connection? I do have a Fingbox installed.
VioletChepil

Comments

  • Marc
    Marc Moderator, Beta Tester Posts: 2,660
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    @dereklee you could try a process of elimination route.  Do you have another phone or other device you can play your game on?  You would need to play in the same spot you normally sit in. With this, trying a first step to narrow down if it’s the phones wifi or something else. 
    Thats Daphnee, she's a good dog...
    VioletChepil
  • Pooh
    Pooh Member, Beta Tester Posts: 674
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    Are you using 2.4Ghz or 5Ghz? I ask only as 2.4Ghz is slower, has less available channels (thus subject to x-channel interference) and also shares the frequency with older Microwave ovens. Even some car alarms can create issues with certain channels.
    People say nothing is impossible, but I do nothing every day.
    VioletChepil
  • kltaylor
    kltaylor Member, Beta Tester Posts: 1,231
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    Pooh said:
    Are you using 2.4Ghz or 5Ghz? I ask only as 2.4Ghz is slower, has less available channels (thus subject to x-channel interference) and also shares the frequency with older Microwave ovens. Even some car alarms can create issues with certain channels.
    5 GHz is best if you're in the same room as the Wifi, but a more stable connection (like Pooh said) would be the 2.4. 
    Another question to ask, is what brand of router are you using at home?  There are consumer-based routers that I will not recommend to anyone, even if they are the cheapest.  Also, how old is the router?
    "There's a fine line between audacity and idiocy."
    -Warden Anastasia Luccio, Captain
    VioletChepiltebasham
  • dereklee
    dereklee Member Posts: 2
    First Comment Photogenic
    kltaylor said:
    5 GHz is best if you're in the same room as the Wifi, but a more stable connection (like Pooh said) would be the 2.4. 
    Another question to ask, is what brand of router are you using at home?  There are consumer-based routers that I will not recommend to anyone, even if they are the cheapest.  Also, how old is the router?
    It's an ASUS router, about 4 years old with the latest firmware. I'm running both 5/2.4 though I seem to connect most often to 5.
    VioletChepil
  • kltaylor
    kltaylor Member, Beta Tester Posts: 1,231
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    dereklee said:
    kltaylor said:
    5 GHz is best if you're in the same room as the Wifi, but a more stable connection (like Pooh said) would be the 2.4. 
    Another question to ask, is what brand of router are you using at home?  There are consumer-based routers that I will not recommend to anyone, even if they are the cheapest.  Also, how old is the router?
    It's an ASUS router, about 4 years old with the latest firmware. I'm running both 5/2.4 though I seem to connect most often to 5.
    Are the two SSID names different from one another?  If not, please try that.  Then connect to the 2.4 and test connectivity.  One of the best ways is to issue a simple PING test to google:
    <code>ping -t google.com</code>
    Monitor that for a few minutes to see if you receive packet loss.  If you do, find a way to hard-wire via ethernet and try it again.  If, after testing with an ethernet cable you still have packet loss, it's either your router or your internet connection.
    In either case, replace the router when you're able to and try testing again.  Chances are (and I am PRO Asus products) the router may just need to be replaced.
    If you replaced the router and you are still having issues with packet loss, contact your ISP.
    "There's a fine line between audacity and idiocy."
    -Warden Anastasia Luccio, Captain
  • MIBSWE
    MIBSWE Member Posts: 25
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    When I used to lose wireless at home, I discovered it was a limitation of my cable provider's router. I have about 40 devices connected and when you go over about 10+ for this router, it would drop wirless. then I would need to restart it every time, at least twice a day. Eventually, I bought a mesh system that supports up to 127 devices and now it works 99% of the time.
    tebasham