How can I turn off IPV6 on my Router?

VABelleVABelle Member Posts: 68
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edited December 2019 in Devices & Security
Where is the setting in the router console (10.0.0.1) for disabling or turning off IPV6?
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  • rootedrooted Gulf Coast, USModerator Posts: 864
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    Not that's it's relevant now but I have the same gateway on Cox and ipv6 can't be disabled.

    I also think that you may need professional help to secure the network and find what damage has been done and what may help repair it.

    VABelle

Answers

  • vulcansheartvulcansheart Member, Beta Tester Posts: 117
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    What type of router do you have? Most likely the answer is yes.
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  • CiaranCiaran Administrator Posts: 1,174
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    Hi @VABelle, as @vulcansheart mentions, there is most likely an option to turn on/off IPV6, however it will depend on your router. If you could give the name of your router, perhaps other users with a similar router may be able to assist (I have also slightly edited your title for searchability reasons) Thanks
    Ciaran (Admin at Fing)
    Getting Started? Please refer to Community guidelines & Community User Guides("Helping Hand"). HAPPY POSTING!!!
  • VABelleVABelle Member Posts: 68
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    edited December 2019
    It is the most recent model that Comcast/Xfinity provides to their customers; they call it their Xfi Router. Shows up on Fing as either Technicolor or Cisco/CGM4140COM.
  • VABelleVABelle Member Posts: 68
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    edited December 2019
    Too late. I spent--literally--hours this morning resetting my router AND MacBook Pro 2018 to factory, setting long/complicated passwords & dual verification wherever I could. My Fingbox showed everything being back to "normal." For a little while, I felt like I had accomplished some semblance of privacy but it was just a matter of time before the HACKER had connected to my network. His MO is to mimic the same name of my network and using 10.0.0.0.1 as IP address. Thanks to Fingbox, its notification was the only way I knew it was happening. The MAC address is different, the MAC Vendor is Cimsys and the OS is ChromeOS. HACKER has also sent some kind of code to my MacBook which now prevents me from accessing 10.0.0.0.1 which I was easily able to do this morning. I tried accessing it from a different browser and lo & behold, HACKER has changed the password. HOW IS THIS HAPPENING? True, Fingbox has blocked it for the moment but I can't keep spending hours on end resetting my laptop AND my router only to have it hacked into again a few hours later. I even have the so-called Advanced Security feature on my network which is supposed to prevent this sort of thing. Is there seriously NO WAY to secure a home network?
  • RobinRobin Administrator, Fing Team Posts: 4,206
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    Care to jump in on this thread @rooted @Marc @Maya @vulcansheart @eJony @Pixelpopperand help @VABelle

    Robin (Admin at Fing)
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  • MarcMarc Moderator, Beta Tester Posts: 2,365
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    @VABelle, I can start the conversation.  One thing I can suggest is to change the SSID, what the router broadcasts as you network name AND set your router so it no longer broadcasts that name so you hacker can’t easily figure it out.  The other folks @Ciaran mentioned should have other tips but this should get you started.
    Thats Daphnee, she's a good dog...
  • vulcansheartvulcansheart Member, Beta Tester Posts: 117
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    edited December 2019
    This thread escalated quickly. From disabling IPv6, to full on damage control!
    Take a look at this thread below. There are some good pointers on hardening your network. However, if you have a device already on your network that is infected, it can continue to spread malware that reopens backdoors into your network and devices. It can be a very long and tedious process to completely clean a network and all attached devices. At some point, you may need to hire professional help from a reputable service.

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  • eJonyeJony Member, Beta Tester Posts: 45
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    @VABelle
    I also think that you can engage Xfinity support too. Since you are paying for a router from them (probably a monthly "rental" fee), they have an obligation to support you. They should provide you with technical support. You can describe exactly what you are seeing and you can ask that they explain what is going on. 

    I don't know if you took the other advice I provided to shut off the "shared WiFi hotspot" feature on your modem/router, but based on the steps you are taking and the things your are seeing, I still think your "stalker/hacker" may be a legit Comcast WiFi hotspot customer that is using your router is a legitimate manner. But Comcast will be able to clarify.
  • VABelleVABelle Member Posts: 68
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    I looked into professional help & they quoted nearly $3,000. May as well be $300,000. 😬 @jony Yes, I turned off the public hotspot feature. Thank you for that suggestion. I just purchased a reputable VPN service so I'm hoping that will help.

  • eJonyeJony Member, Beta Tester Posts: 45
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    Hi @VABelle
    That quote is crazy. Glad you turned off the public hotspot. The VPN service will add another layer of protection for any device using the VPN. I'd also recommend using a password manager and changing every password that you have. I know you've already done a lot of that with your router and also for your WiFi networks. But having a password manager and very strong passwords, in this day and age, in my opinion, is the most important thing you can do to protect yourself.
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