Found a unknown IP camera on my network

flmoptopflmoptop Posts: 2Member
First Comment

Found an unknown  IP camera on my network, can I some how access it to see where it is? 

Answers

  • VioletChepilVioletChepil London, UKPosts: 2,474Member
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    Hello @flmoptop
    You cannot access this via the Fing App.
    I am not sure what to suggest on this one.
    @pwmeek @Marc @kltaylor @Pooh @Hronos @Pixelpopper - anything to add on this? 

    Community Manager at Fing

  • MarcMarc Posts: 620Moderator, Beta Tester
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    Its kind of hard to pinpoint an unknown wifi device's location @flmoptop, especially with just consumer tools...    Is it on your network, aka you can see it via your routers device list and its using on of your IP addresses?  If it is and you have a fingbox, block it.  If its on your network and no fingbox, change your wifi password asap.  


    Thats Daphnee, she's a good dog...
    HronosVioletChepil
  • pwmeekpwmeek Posts: 108Member, Beta Tester
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    You have the IP address. Try it in your browser: http://10.0.0.xxx or whatever your network uses for the first three octads. This checks the standard http port, 80, automatically. If it's a plain IP camera, you should at least see the login page (if it is protected).
    If not, try a few other common http ports thusly:
    http://10.0.0.xxx:88
    http://10.0.0.xxx:8080
    http://10.0.0.xxx:8008
    http://10.0.0.xxx:8800
    http://10.0.0.xxx:8000
    You can use Fing to 'Find Open Ports' to see if there is some other port you might try.
    As a last resort you might Google [ common ip camera ports ]. You might find some others.
    --Pete
    Bon Vivant and Raconteur
    MarcVioletChepilKkranenTristan
  • flmoptopflmoptop Posts: 2Member
    First Comment

    It has no open ports.

    VioletChepil
  • eJonyeJony Posts: 45Member, Beta Tester
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    edited December 2019
    Marc said:
    Its kind of hard to pinpoint an unknown wifi device's location @flmoptop, ...  If ... you have a fingbox, block it.

    I'm assuming you have a Fing Box. Marc's suggestion to block it is good. But I would try to determine if it is plugged in or WiFi. You should know what is physically connected to your network based on ethernet cables plugged your Wifi Router/Switch. If it is on Wifi (which you should be able to determine based on the IP address you can see from Fing and by logging into your access point/router. You can also capture the MAC address of the camera and search it (the first couple of segments of the MAC address identify the manufacture. That might also help you track it down.

    The suggestion to change your WiFi password is also very sound. 
    MarcVioletChepil
  • ybotspawnybotspawn Posts: 1Member
    First Comment
    I ran into the same issue.  I think there actually might be a bug in Fing.  In my case, the device in question had a mac address prefix of D4:B7:61.  It too did not listen to any ports.  I initially blocked the device, in my router, and reviewed my DNS logs.  I found that the device in question was my 2 month old daughters Snoo (https://www.happiestbaby.com/pages/snoo) baby sleeper.  I found this as I saw it making DNS requests to the Snoo web api.  I attempted to use the app and found that I couldn't, which was expected after placing a block on it at the router.  It appears that Fing considers this device as an IP camera, even though it is not (Snoo does not have a camera attached to it). If you're running down an "IP Camera", keep in mind it may not actually be a camera as Fing appears to be misleading on this categorization

    eJonyVioletChepil
  • MarcMarc Posts: 620Moderator, Beta Tester
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    ybotspawn said:
    I ran into the same issue.  I think there actually might be a bug in Fing.  In my case, the device in question had a mac address prefix of D4:B7:61.  It too did not listen to any ports.  I initially blocked the device, in my router, and reviewed my DNS logs.  I found that the device in question was my 2 month old daughters Snoo (https://www.happiestbaby.com/pages/snoo) baby sleeper.  I found this as I saw it making DNS requests to the Snoo web api.  I attempted to use the app and found that I couldn't, which was expected after placing a block on it at the router.  It appears that Fing considers this device as an IP camera, even though it is not (Snoo does not have a camera attached to it). If you're running down an "IP Camera", keep in mind it may not actually be a camera as Fing appears to be misleading on this categorization

    @Ciaran, can you comment on what @ybotspawn has seen with the misidentification?  Have you folks seen this before and if not should it be entered as a bug?
    Thats Daphnee, she's a good dog...
    VioletChepilBrettly61
  • Brettly61Brettly61 Posts: 5Member, Beta Tester
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    I’ve seen a few phantom devices showing up on home networks. I moved into a new house and this was right when video doorbells started a few years ago.

    The previous owner of the house, was a tech-guy and he had big screens and wireless speakers 7.1, the whole home theater. Everything was wired

    All in all, I found 5 devices from the attic to the basement that were orphaned and pinging my network. I found 2 smoke / CO detector with WiFi capability. A Yale Keyless entry pad on the side door is also radioactive as is a signal redistribution box in the basement.

    So you never know what gadgets are going to be flummoxing you on any given day.

    Marc
  • MarcMarc Posts: 620Moderator, Beta Tester
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    Brettly61 said:

    I’ve seen a few phantom devices showing up on home networks. I moved into a new house and this was right when video doorbells started a few years ago.

    The previous owner of the house, was a tech-guy and he had big screens and wireless speakers 7.1, the whole home theater. Everything was wired

    All in all, I found 5 devices from the attic to the basement that were orphaned and pinging my network. I found 2 smoke / CO detector with WiFi capability. A Yale Keyless entry pad on the side door is also radioactive as is a signal redistribution box in the basement.

    So you never know what gadgets are going to be flummoxing you on any given day.

    Never thought of this...  WiFi devices are getting so common that people are leaving them behind, and with that they are probably still active.  Thanks for bringing this angle up on things to be aware of.
    Thats Daphnee, she's a good dog...
  • garyprudgaryprud Posts: 1Member
    First Comment Photogenic

    The Fing app continues to find an Amazon Fire Stick on my network. After comparing ip abd mac data against known devices I determined the app has assigned Fire Stick to one of my 5 Echo Dot pucks! Any chance a similar mismatch had occurred?

  • MarcMarc Posts: 620Moderator, Beta Tester
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    @garyprud I've seen similar mismatches but usually after correcting them in Fing they usually do not reappear.  I often wonder if that is a result of some of Fings identification being crowd sourced, meaning an erroneous identification at some point by a user that gets into Fings identification database?
    Thats Daphnee, she's a good dog...
  • lredlefsenlredlefsen Posts: 6Member
    Name Dropper Photogenic First Comment
    garyprud said:

    I determined the [Fing] app has assigned [Amazon] Fire Stick to one of my 5 [Amazon] Echo Dot pucks!

    Marc said:
    @garyprud I often wonder if that is a result of some of Fings identification being crowd sourced, meaning an erroneous identification at some point by a user that gets into Fings identification database?
    If Fing "identifies" device types purely based on MAC OUI (the top 24 bits of the 48-bit MAC address), then these types of mistakes will happen: a particular OUI was assigned to Amazon, which probably split up the 16 million address range among various devices, i.e., Fire Stick, Echo Dot, and possibly a bunch of others (Kindle, Fire tablets, Amazon Dash buttons, etc., etc.), and the first user to identify that OUI to Fing had a Fire Stick.
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