Static IP’s and your thoughts on them

D00B
D00B Member, Beta Tester Posts: 7
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For the most part, residential ISP’s don’t offer a static IP to their customers. This is something (here in the UK anyway, yes BT I’m looking at you) that is not regularly available.

Do you guys and gals have a static and what positives and negatives do you have from having one?

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GidsterVioletChepil

Comments

  • Pooh
    Pooh Member, Beta Tester Posts: 674
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    If all you're doing is everyday humdrum stuff then a static IP address won't buy you anything.

    The two places you can win out are when you are running services from a server inside your home network or (and this is far less apparent) if you're working from home and your work is configured to allow only certain IP's to connect to their systems (yup, this does happen - much hilarity ensues when you're on a dynamic IP and the lease expires :o ).

    Some ISPs will also only allow you to have a static IP address if you also rent some of their networking equipment.

    Finally, nothing comes free - ISPs love to charge extra for static IPs - my hope is that as we move deeper into IPv6 that Static IP's will be commonplace and freely available.
    People say nothing is impossible, but I do nothing every day.
    MarcVioletChepilHronos
  • benhelps
    benhelps Member, Beta Tester Posts: 29
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    I haven't had one in a while, however my balance is simply having a DynDNS domain which follows the current home IP, and a decent telco that doesn't block ports and allowed me to opt out of their CT-NAT'ting of their customers (to save money in reducing costs of buying more IPv4).
    D00BVioletChepil
  • tebasham
    tebasham Member Posts: 6
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    I've never bothered with one at home and use NoIP to allow access from outside.  (With that said I've never run into an employer that restricts access to the VPN based on source IP either though.)
    VioletChepil
  • Pooh
    Pooh Member, Beta Tester Posts: 674
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    tebasham said:
    ...With that said I've never run into an employer that restricts access to the VPN based on source IP either though.
    Yeah, nor had I until Bear #2 started working from home and found one day after a longer power outage that she couldn't get onto the VPN. Totally nuts if you ask me...
    People say nothing is impossible, but I do nothing every day.
  • D00B
    D00B Member, Beta Tester Posts: 7
    Photogenic First Comment

    I’ve used dynDNS before for some time and found it worthwhile. A couple of issues from that service came one or two applications that wouldn’t allow a ‘name’ and only allowed IP numbers. I believe this was a Cisco device if my mind serves me right.

    i believe the option of a static IP should be available to all, V6 or V4 in this day and age. It should not be limited to business consumers.

    Ang
  • VioletChepil
    VioletChepil London, UKMember Posts: 2,471
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    Ok @D00B I've moved this one over to connectivity since it is related to ISPs. Let me know if any issues at all! Cheers, Violet

    Community Manager at Fing

  • Pooh
    Pooh Member, Beta Tester Posts: 674
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    edited August 14, 2019 #8
    D00B said:

    i believe the option of a static IP should be available to all, V6 or V4 in this day and age. It should not be limited to business consumers.

    The problem with v4 is that we've all but run out of IPv4 addresses on the general market. As a result they've notw almost reached commodity status. 
    People say nothing is impossible, but I do nothing every day.
    VioletChepilHronos
  • kltaylor
    kltaylor Member, Beta Tester Posts: 1,231
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    tebasham said:
    I've never bothered with one at home and use NoIP to allow access from outside.  (With that said I've never run into an employer that restricts access to the VPN based on source IP either though.)
    I have, and I think it would definitely matter what professional industry they are in, who would request something like that.

    I've had requests to permit only specific public IPs to the VPN due to the sensitivity of the data that's being transferred, and if that person didn't pay for a static IP (which I believe is a blatant rip-off/cash grab), troubleshooting/diagnosing why they cannot connect to the VPN server can be fun! =)
    "There's a fine line between audacity and idiocy."
    -Warden Anastasia Luccio, Captain
    VioletChepil
  • RichCreedy
    RichCreedy Member, Beta Tester Posts: 38
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    I hate my business isp policy of peered static ip addresses, makes running an exchange server a pain in the ass. router gets dynamic ip address, and statics are routed through that via login details, running websites on your own servers is fine, but my email is often blocked because of the soured dynamic ip address that I sometimes get., also gets blocked because spf doesn't match. grrr

    VioletChepilHronos
  • Lee_Bo
    Lee_Bo Member Posts: 271
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    Spectrum offers static IP addresses.....for a fee.
    So I use dynamic DNS so I can always VPN back to my home file server if I need to grab photos stored on my file server.
    VioletChepilAng
  • Mattman
    Mattman Member, Beta Tester Posts: 26
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    My current ISP here in Anchorage gives you one static IP with the 1 gig tier of consumer internet service. I used to pay for it before then as I had a mail server running at home. I now have moved all of that out of my house and pay for someone else to host it. Still the static IP allows me to run an FTP server when I need it easily. I don't think I would pay separately any more, but it's a nice option.
    kltaylorVioletChepil
  • Murray
    Murray Member Posts: 12
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    Haven’t spotted any real diff since swopping from BT to Zen (fixed ip as std). I guess I don’t get the very short downtime I used to get on BT when the ip changed.
    VioletChepil
  • kltaylor
    kltaylor Member, Beta Tester Posts: 1,231
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    Lee_Bo said:
    Spectrum offers static IP addresses.....for a fee.
    So I use dynamic DNS so I can always VPN back to my home file server if I need to grab photos stored on my file server.
    A lot of the ISP's here in the states use Static Public IP as an 'add-on', even with business level internet service.  Since I use Business Level with Comcast, if I want a static IP address it's an extra $20/mo for that.  To me, that's an insane cash grab that ranks up there with the whole 'loot boxes' in games debate.
    The idea of restricting bandwidth and static IP address are just another way for big-box ISPs to bring in more of your hard-earned wages.
    Dynamic DNS services are the way-to-go if you refuse (like me) to give in to the big box ISP for a static public IP.  Problem with that though, if you opted to run your own DNS (because I can) and link that with a encrypted service to instill a DNSCrypt server that I own and trust, well you get the idea.
    I also have my own domain name that, in order for it to resolve to the correct, self-hosted website, needs a static public IP.  What a wonderful spin we have happening here in the good 'ole US of A.
    "There's a fine line between audacity and idiocy."
    -Warden Anastasia Luccio, Captain
    MattmanVioletChepil
  • Navek
    Navek Member Posts: 11
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    edited August 26, 2019 #15

    So at the moment I have a statics ip on my business internet service in home, my business is cell phone and computer repairs hardware and software. I do your standard screen repairs but and other hardware related ect but also things Like IMEI Repair and bypass google frp locks witch I offer remotly and also offer remote support

    having a static ip Allows me to. More easily remotely connect to my home to acsesss the servers I need out of home just one less thing I have to deal with other wise I would be havei g to use a service like duckdns (duckdns is an amazing free service and can be used with almost no effort)

    im using home assistant in combination with my smartthings hub as in my early home automation days invested into zwave and zigbee so I don't want to just stop using it. But before HA didn't have a remote service so static ip was an easy way to remotly connect.


    Down side it unevrytted

    VioletChepil
  • GadgetVirtuoso
    GadgetVirtuoso Member Posts: 21
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    In the US static IPs are largely only available with business accounts, however, my home IP changes so infrequently that it might as well be static. I had the same IP for the 2 years I have AT&T Gigabit fiber. That said I have my NAS setup for DDNS so even if it were offered for a small fee there's no reason to have it.
    VioletChepil
  • Jack
    Jack Member Posts: 54
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    I don’t have the option (BT) yet loads of otherISP have it as a free or £5 option. I personally use a DDNS service pointed to a CNAME record on my domain and it works fine except for firewall rules :-(

    VioletChepil
  • Ang
    Ang Member, Beta Tester Posts: 6
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    D00B said:

    I’ve used dynDNS before for some time and found it worthwhile. A couple of issues from that service came one or two applications that wouldn’t allow a ‘name’ and only allowed IP numbers. I believe this was a Cisco device if my mind serves me right.

    i believe the option of a static IP should be available to all, V6 or V4 in this day and age. It should not be limited to business consumers.

    I agree completely! I am not limited in the use or number of static IPs and nor subject to fees by my ISP. After careful consideration I am moving to static for stability reasons mostly related to me migrating towards a generally higher level of network security but mostly I have had some device conflicts with DHCP. Why some ISPs limit this to business customers or tack on exorbitant fees is strictly because they do, IMHO. Business as usual. I hope to see this practice stopped.
    VioletChepil