Using complex routers with Fingbox

ThinkFingThinkFing Posts: 21Member, Beta Tester
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Many routers support either separable or linked 2.4GHz and 5GHz connections, sometimes with the ability to have one or more separate Guest Networks with admin-defined SSIDs. To make this more complex, each radio (2.4GHz and 5GHz) will have different device addresses. This means, presently, that Fingbox only registers one of those devices/networks, although it may be possible for Fingbox to see some of the  traffic on the non-Fingbox side of the router.

What recommendations do people have for using Fingbox with such a router?
VioletChepil

Comments

  • VioletChepilVioletChepil London, UKPosts: 2,474Member
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    I've promoted this one and let's see if any others can chime in. @Lee_Bo @RichCreedy @Ajax @KayJay 

    Community Manager at Fing

  • AjaxAjax Posts: 30Member
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    I've only ever used 2.4 and switched off 5 completely. 2.4 has better range and I find that for me it provides enough speed even with multiple devices running streaming media.
    VioletChepil
  • Lee_BoLee_Bo Posts: 98Member
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    My Ubiquity has both 2.4 and 5 (same SSID) and DHCP is the same for both.  All devices connect to 5 if it's stronger and 2.4 if 5 isn't good enough.  This way there are few devices on 2.4 (which Ring only uses) so I don't have to worry much about interference.

    However, if you wanted to use different vlans for each you'd either have to (1) get two Fingboxes or (2) use Domotz.  Option 1 would be cheaper, but you'd also need version 2 for intrusion protection on 5ghz since version 1 only has 2.4ghz radios.
    VioletChepil
  • ThinkFingThinkFing Posts: 21Member, Beta Tester
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    Ajax said:
    I've only ever used 2.4 and switched off 5 completely. 2.4 has better range and I find that for me it provides enough speed even with multiple devices running streaming media.
    I have an ASUS DSL-AC68U and I find that the 5GHz signal strength is adequate for most purposes, including connection speed and throughput but some fiendish (attached) devices only support 2.4GHz. Additionally, it seems a though there may be a fault with the 2.4GHz side such that the connection drops / freezes periodically. Could be time for a complete firmware re-install perhaps. 
    VioletChepil
  • RomulusRomulus Posts: 34Member, Beta Tester
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    I have an ASUS RT-AC86U and two RT-AC68U's (well technically they are hacked RT-AC1900's) in a mesh configuration and devices hand-off between 2.4 and 5GHz across all 3 devices pretty seamlessly. So I get the benefit of 5GHz speed when clients are close to access points and range on 2.4 when they are not.

    Regarding the mesh, I do have to reboot the devices occasionally (maybe once a month or two), as they get a little grumpy after a while. The Asus mesh functionality is relatively new so I expect the stability to improve although it's not bad now. Asus offer what is probably the cheapest mesh network as you can buy RT-AC1900's for $50 and upgrade them to RT-AC68U's (if you are technically savvy).
    VioletChepil
  • RichCreedyRichCreedy Posts: 34Member, Beta Tester
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    some people separate the networks by adding 2.4ghz or 5ghz on the relevant radios
    VioletChepil
  • ThinkFingThinkFing Posts: 21Member, Beta Tester
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    some people separate the networks by adding 2.4ghz or 5ghz on the relevant radios
    I already do this - but its the 2.4GHz radio that FIngbox sees, so the information is somewhat limited. 
    VioletChepil
  • UsagiNZUsagiNZ Posts: 17Member
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    I run multiple routers, with a mix of just 2.4GHz and dual 2.4/5GHz - most are running OpenWRT/LEDE firmware and are connected by wired Gigabit ethernet backhaul.
    My FingBox is connected to my backbone switch, but is probably in-range of all the 2.4GHz radios.
    It has detected all my routers and reports that it's "protecting" them, suggesting it has some level of connectivity with them.
    It's hard to know what I'm missing, as it's probably able to pick up any wireless device (regardless of 2.4/5GHz), since it's all on the same network (it'll see the ARP requests, even on a switched network).
    I've raised a feature request to have some kind of FingBox extension app that runs on the routers, as this would ensure full visibility of what's going on (regardless of frequency) and potentially enhance the blocking/throttling capabilities.

    Thanks
    VioletChepil
  • ThinkFingThinkFing Posts: 21Member, Beta Tester
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    UsagiNZ said:
    I've raised a feature request to have some kind of FingBox extension app that runs on the routers, as this would ensure full visibility of what's going on (regardless of frequency) and potentially enhance the blocking/throttling capabilities.
    I agree that router integration would be an excellent idea. The problem as I see it is the number of routers for which an app would need to be written. I don't think there is a standard API which could be interrogated that would simplify the process.
    VioletChepil
  • RichCreedyRichCreedy Posts: 34Member, Beta Tester
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    edited September 2019
    ThinkFing said:
    UsagiNZ said:
    I've raised a feature request to have some kind of FingBox extension app that runs on the routers, as this would ensure full visibility of what's going on (regardless of frequency) and potentially enhance the blocking/throttling capabilities.
    I agree that router integration would be an excellent idea. The problem as I see it is the number of routers for which an app would need to be written. I don't think there is a standard API which could be interrogated that would simplify the process.
    for most routers I would suggest a Linux based api, as they all seem to use a bastardised version of it
    ThinkFingVioletChepil
  • ThinkFingThinkFing Posts: 21Member, Beta Tester
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    Good point ... certainly for many Linux-based routers (probably not including those with DSL modems though) there exists alternative firmware  (e.g DD-WRT, Tomato, Merlin, LibreCMC etc) that might be amenable to having Fingbox support added.
    VioletChepil
  • RichCreedyRichCreedy Posts: 34Member, Beta Tester
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    ThinkFing said:
    UsagiNZ said:
    I've raised a feature request to have some kind of FingBox extension app that runs on the routers, as this would ensure full visibility of what's going on (regardless of frequency) and potentially enhance the blocking/throttling capabilities.
    I agree that router integration would be an excellent idea. The problem as I see it is the number of routers for which an app would need to be written. I don't think there is a standard API which could be interrogated that would simplify the process.
    for most routers I would suggest a Linux based api, as they all seem to use a bastardised Linux kernal

    ThinkFing
  • RWildRWild Posts: 17Member
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    The router supplied by my ISP (AT&T) by default manages whether a device is connected to the 2.4 or the 5 GHz radio and I have always run it this mode.  For this to work, the SSID must be the same for each radio.

    I have not been aware of any problems with the Fingbox nor have I ever noticed the gateway/modem/router change the radio that a device is connected to.  I have as many devices as possible connected via cables rather than WiFi.
    VioletChepil
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